Paul Dwyer: A Scotsman singing Turkish folk!

You have to listen to this guy!

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7 thoughts on “Paul Dwyer: A Scotsman singing Turkish folk!

    • Yes, a Turkish colleague introduced me to him. Isn’t it marvelous? Reminds me of EM Forster: ‘Only connect!’ It has to be better than bombing each other, huh?

      • Hey Alan,

        Unfortunately, the lyrics are beyond my grasp. French and English only for this head of mine. But the guitar is beautiful and flawless, and his voice and the melody are unearthly. Too bad that I can’t tap the substance of the poetry. I’m sure it would enhance what is already a satisfying aesthetic experience. And it occurs to me now that he probably has an entire catalogeue of English renditions. So I’ll have to look, eh?

      • I found one album on iTunes, which I’ve bought – a sampling of his Turkish folk songs. Can’t find any English translations, and, like any folk song, it’s not easy to translate. The words are in a local dialect and there is a background story that you need to know to really get the meaning. It seems this song tells of a true story that happened many years ago. Al Fadime was the most beautiful girl in the village. Efe Kadir was a handsome young lad, and the two were in love. Fadime’s family didn’t consider the young man worthy of their daughter, so the two eloped. The girl’s family were furious and pursued them. They were caught before they had gone very far. Kadir spent nine months in prison and the girl was forced to marry a friend of the family. Many villagers sympathised with the unfortunate young lovers, however, and composed the song for them. You can find the words, Turkish of course, here, and try a google translation, but I doubt if it will do a good job: http://www.turkuler.com/sozler/turku_al_fadimem.html

  1. Loved the melody and chords. Beautiful voice and guitar work.

    Sometimes, you don’t need the words’ meanings to get the effect and message!

    Thanks!

    • You’re right. Often the music is enough – and sometimes understanding the words can even detract from the enjoyment. Christian hymns are a good example of this 😉 Anyway, see my previous comment for the background story.

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