Why should Turkey be first?

we-dont-live-in-a-democracy-we-live-in-a-hypocrisy-quote-1What would you say to an online news outlet founded by an Arab-American entrepreneur based in Washington DC who also happened to be president and chairman of an investment company set up to help companies secure reconstruction contracts in Iraq? What if the guy had close ties to the Bush family and both Bush administrations? If he was, in fact, a friend and business partner of former president George W. Bush’s brother Neil, and a “major contributor” to the presidential campaigns of both George Bushes, father and son? Would alarm bells ring if you knew he had been involved in the founding of Syria’s ruling (minority) Ba’ath Party, and was a strong supporter of beleaguered dictator, Bashar Assad? If his biography boasted that he had “over thirty years of experience managing investments in oil and gas, telecommunications, high technology, media, manufacturing and real estate”?

Would it colour your assessment if you learned that major contributors to the website included former top-level people in the US State Department and the CIA? That it is an “invaluable” source of information for The Wall Street Journal, Time Magazine, The New York Times and The Economist?

That’s a sample of what I turned up when I went searching for background on the Al-Monitor website and its founder, Jamal Daniel. Check him out for yourself: Counterpunch, Mediabiasfactcheck, Tabletmag.com

Well, pardon my cynicism, but when I read an article on that site taking Turkey’s government to task for its failure to address the issue of climate change, I wanted to laugh out loud! A big noise in the fossil fuel industry, major financial backer of GH (The American way of life is not up for negotiations”) Bush, funding criticism of a developing country for its “misguided energy policies”?

energy-sources-german-2016-1The article compared Turkey’s electricity generation unfavourably with that of Germany which, allegedly, produces far more power from solar energy under its its cold, cloudy skies. Well, I took a look at figures for electricity generation in Germany. The latest I could find were for 2016. If my arithmetic is correct, the Germans are producing 52.7% from fossil fuel sources, and a further 13.1% from nuclear plants. Admittedly they claim 29% is based on renewable sources, but that includes hydro.

Turkey, for comparison, according to the latest figures, produces over 40% from renewable sources, and 58% from coal and natural gas. Well, it’s not ideal, for sure, but I don’t see anything for the Germans to be particularly self-righteous about. And in fact Turkey’s government is actively encouraging the development of wind and solar electricity generation. Click the links if you’re interested (sorry if you can’t read Turkish):

Wind energy    Solar energy

US-States-and-Economies-with-Similar-GDPs-2015

And still they’re poisoning the planet!

And what about the United States? Again, I couldn’t find the latest figures, but in 2014 the principal sources of US electricity were: coal (39%), natural gas (27%), nuclear (19%), Hydro (6%), and other renewables (7%). Do the maths. 66% fossil fuels and 19% nuclear. No wonder the developing world is not interested in listening to the pious pontificating of American “environmentalists”. Physician, heal thyself! And have a go at China if you are sincere in your desire to clean up Planet Earth!

Another article that appeared on the same Al-Monitor site launched intoTurkey’s skyrocketing welfare spending”. The writer quoted figures showing that “welfare assistance to the poor” had increased from 1.3 billion Turkish Liras in 2002 to 33.7 billion TL by 2016 – the period in which the country has been governed by RT Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party. The essence of the argument seemed to be that the government’s social welfare programme had become “a major instrument to lure and control voters”.

windmills in turkey

Wind turbines in Turkey

Well, leave aside that the writer’s computational skills seem not up to the task of converting raw data to a percentage – and the fact that Al-Monitor locates Turkey unequivocally in the Middle East. It may be that Throughout Turkey’s Republican history, no other government” has channelled so much money into social welfare programmes – but I have to tell you, that cash was sorely needed. Turkey was governed for decades by a socio-economic elite that allowed the majority of the population to languish in underdeveloped ignorance, staging regular military coups every ten years when the democratic process threatened their hold on power.

These days Turkey has a working egalitarian health system that most Americans would envy if they knew about it. The public sector has been upgraded so that personnel are educated and trained, and offices are modern and well equipped. You make appointments on the internet and there is no longer any need to bribe your way through the bureaucratic process. State retirement pensions are regularly increased in line with single-digit inflation, and paid automatically on time.

Such methods, I agree, may not be in line with IMF and World bank guidelines that aim to embroil developing countries in increasing unpayable debt before forcing “belt-tightening” austerity measures on reluctant governments. But hey! Hands up who envies the Greeks their current economic mess.

Turkey’s opposition, we are told, “is at a loss and unable to come up with a counterstrategy other than pledging to give out more, which seems to have had little effect so far. In short, the government’s policy of vote hunting through welfare assistance remains without an alternative in Turkey. As a result, the votes of millions remain hostage to the aid they receive and continue to sway elections.”

Well, that’s one way of looking at it. Take your socialist ideas of helping the poor too far and you may end up like Venezuela – your economy in tatters despite having the world’s second largest proven oil reserves. Uncle Sam’s got his eye on you!

So, it seems, in the eyes of the West, Turkey should be setting an example to the rest of the world:

  • Stop generating electricity until you can do it all using renewable resources. And hydro’s not acceptable if it means using water, or flooding areas that may contain places of historical interest (just about everywhere in Turkey!).
  • Front up and admit to having genocided innocent Armenians – and pay large reparations. Maybe the USA will follow suit and pay up for genociding its indigenous people; and join with the Brits in recompensing descendants of the African slaves who kick-started their industrial development. And the French will atone for killing 1.5 million Algerians.
  • Stop whining about that attempted military coup last July. Forgive and forget! Maybe those people did try to overthrow the democratically elected government using tanks and machine guns – but come on! That’s just freedom of expression, isn’t it? Nothing to hold a grudge over.
  • Stop trying to modernise your country and compete with the giants of the industrial world. Accept your fate as a backward Third World has-been, and be happy.
  • Keep crawling on your knees to the European Union, whose leaders have no intention of ever admitting you to their club. Do everything they tell you to do, and persist in a pathetic, trusting naïveté that one day they’ll let you in.
  • Accept your role as sanctuary for the millions of refugees fleeing from the civil war in Syria. Police your borders so none of them can escape to Western Europe to threaten the comfort of our complacent, privileged lifestyles.

Have I missed anything? If you have any more useful advice to give Turkey’s government, please feel free to set your own house in order first. Then they may start to take you seriously.

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Why should Turkey be first?

    • Thanks Lara. Like economists, reporters usually depend on someone with money to pay their wages. I guess it’s the same everywhere. It’s just a tad annoying when some people crow about their wonderful democracy – and criticise others for their lack of it.

  1. Yeah, let’s not ignore the fact that that the US seems to think that more sanctions (on top of the ones already there and not at all related to the current situation of course) will fix an already broken economy. This leaves the US with another little matter; Citgo. As collateral it will soon be in Russian hands and is headquartered in Texas. Revenue: $32Billion+
    I’m certain this situation will improve American – Russian relations.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s