Strolling around old Istanbul – and not thinking about the election

We had a three-day holiday to celebrate the end of the Ramadan month of fasting. Left alone, I did some wandering around less frequented parts of the old city.

Mahmut II tomb2

Monumental cemetery  – tombs of late Ottoman luminaries including three 19th century Sultans: Mahmut II, Abdülaziz and Abdülhamid II

Cerrah Mehmed Paşa Cami3

Cerrah Mehmed Pasha Mosque, 1583. The architect, Davut Ağa was a pupil of the great Sinan

Arkadios Column2

Only the base remains of the 5th century Arkadios column, centre of a flourishing slave market in former times

Koca Mustafa Paşa Complex2

Koca Mustafa Pasha mosque complex – built in 1489 on the site of a former Byzantine monastery. The tomb contains the remains of a royal princess, daughter of the Emperor Constantine XI, who is said to have converted to Islam.

Hekim Ali Paşa Complex2

Interior of Hekimoğlu Ali Pasha mosque, built by an 18th century Grand Vizier.

Haseki complex3

Haseki mosque complex – the third largest in Istanbul, built by the architect Sinan on the orders of Hürrem Sultan, wife of Süleiman the Magnificent. The complex contained schools, a hospital and a soup kitchen to feed the poor.

Giant walnut

Ancient walnut tree, dating from who knows when?

Çinili Cami

Recently restored mosque (in Üsküdar) of Kösem Sultan, one of the greatest Ottoman women – built in 1640, and known as Çinili, or the Tiled Mosque, because of the beauty of its decorative ceramic tiles.

Çinili Cami5

Mihrab (altar) and mimber (pulpit) in Çinili Mosque – afer a four-year restoration.

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