Grenfell fire: Protests, anger as death toll rises

A spokesperson for the European Parliament has expressed strong support for a Turkish opposition politician embarking on a march demanding justice. Let’s see what the European parliament has to say about the unspeakable crime committed in London.

Al Jazeera: Scores of people attending a rally on Friday for victims of a tower block fire tragedy in London stormed a local town hall as the death toll rose to at least 30. The angry protesters barged their way through an automatic door at Kensington and Chelsea town hall and sought to gain entry to an upper floor. Police barred their way and scuffles broke out.

protest-“We want justice!” “Shame on you!” and “Killers!” the protesters shouted, with some holding up pictures of those still unaccounted for and now feared dead.

Earlier, Commander Stuart Cundy said police would examine whether criminal offences had been committed although they said there was nothing to suggest the massive blaze at the 24-storey Grenfell Tower in West London was started deliberately.

“We know that at least 30 people have died as a result of this fire,” Cundy said. “Sadly, it is expected that the total will rise and it is not expected that any survivors will be found.”

“When you have a fire that takes hold like that, that is literally an inferno. You get a lot of fragmentation of bodies, charring of bones and sometimes all that’s left is ash,” said Peter Vanezis, a professor of forensic medical sciences at Queen Mary University in London. He said the temperature of the blaze at Grenfell Tower was comparable to a cremation.

UK Telegraph: The confirmed death toll has risen to 30 but is expected to soar significantly, police have said, as anger mounts over a litany of failings that led to the disaster.

Missing people

As yet unaccounted for . . .

After a string of politicians have been heckled by angry locals demanding answers, more than 2,700 people are said to be attending a Westminster rally on Friday night to demand “justice” – raising fears that tensions could boil over.

The Royal Borough of Chelsea and Kensington Council has refused requests to release a list of known residents in Glenfell Tower.

UK Telegraph: Man jailed for sharing photo of dead Grenfell Tower fire victim on Facebook

A man who posted pictures on Facebook of the body of someone believed to have leapt to his death from the Grenfell Tower fire has been jailed for three months.

Omega Mwaikambo, 43, posted one video and two pictures of the body bag with the man inside and then later five pictures of the victim’s face and body after opening it to look inside.

He pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates Court to two counts of sending by a public communications network an offending, indecent or obscene matter.

And from a less mainstream source:

In a Channel 4 News interview with Jon Snow on Thursday, singer Lily Allen, who lives in the area, accused the media and the government of downplaying the death toll, which was 17 at the time.

“Seventeen [people]? I’m hearing frm people that the figure is closer to 150 and many of those are children.,” Allen added, saying she’d been given this information off-the-record from emergency services at the scene.

Tower block fire in London

Are you telling me 12 people [or 17] are dead?

A woman speaking to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire said on Thursday afternoon: “More than 50 children are dead and it’s not confirmed because their parents are missing . . . look at that building. Are you telling me 12 people are dead?”

Journalist Rozan Ahmed says that for the past 24 hours she has been contacting hospitals for information about the missing people from the Glenfell Tower blaze. She claims the authorities are not providing adequate information about missing people.

In an Instagram post, Ahmed said: “How are 17 dead when hundreds are yet to be accounted for? Where are they? My auntie and her 2 children are nowhere to be found. Every hospital has been scoured and not one was able to provide a LIST of patients from #Grenfell? Why?”

The Mind of a Terrorist – Not that complicated really

First I want to talk about tourism. I’m not a big fan. I did feel sorry for Turkey last year when the Russian government got the pip and told their citizens to stay on local icy beaches for the summer. I know hotels have been closing because governments in Europe (and New Zealand) have been scaring their people off visiting Turkey. Falling visitor numbers impacts on the local economy, and innocent people find themselves out of work.

NZ walks

Getting away from it all in NZ

On the other hand, everything has a price – and floods of tourists undoubtedly have a negative effect on natural beauties and historical wonders. The ancient city of Ephesus in Turkey’s Aegean region suffers from the trampling feet of millions of visitors. New Zealand’s main attraction for tourists is its clean, green, unspoiled nature. Tourist numbers, however, are multiplying spectacularly, and now it seems, forest trails a tramper might once have trekked in peaceful solitude must now be shared with thousands of others.

So I have mixed feelings on the subject. It does, however, annoy me when I receive yet another email from our Foreign Affairs people at the embassy in Ankara warning me of the terrorism danger in Turkey, and advising me to avoid unnecessary visits to the capital or Istanbul (where I happen to live). I would be interested to know what proportion of visitors to Turkey have been killed or injured in recent years, and to compare it with similar figures for New Zealand.

yavuz-sultan-selim-koprusu-nde-ilk-olumlu-kaza

Truck driver killed taking selfie on bridge

I read an article recently citing statistics showing that more people died in the last year while taking a “selfie” than were killed by sharks. Just last year two old friends from New Zealand visited us and spent three weeks in the country. In the morning of 28 June we picked up a hire car from Istanbul’s Atatürk Airport – where that afternoon forty people died in a bomb attack. They flew out of the country on 14 July – the day before military officers staged an unsuccessful attempt to overthrow by force the elected government.

What am I trying to say here? There are many ways to die, and most of them are less spectacular than a terrorist bombing. And whether it’s your day to go depends a lot on whether you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time. A young woman from Turkey died in New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake in 2010 – one of 185 people from twenty countries who were certainly in the wrong place at the wrong time. Nevertheless, tourists are flooding to New Zealand, and I never heard that Turkey’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs was advising citizens to avoid my country. I have read several articles warning about the dangers of taking selfies – but people carry on regardless.

So I guess life will go on in Paris, Manchester and London. Locals will go to work and school, and tourists will still flock to the Louvre, Westminster Abbey and Etihad Stadium (home of Manchester City Football Club). The big problems, in my opinion, are the chattering news media, and governments playing political games.

Ariana grande

Sorry, Mr Harkin – It’s not about her

After the Manchester nightclub attack, my hometown daily, The New Zealand Herald, published an opinion piece by one James Harkin, said to be director of the Centre for Investigative Journalism and a reporter on Syria and the rise of Islamic State. Well, the article was originally printed in the UK’s Daily Mail, so that possibly leaves room for doubt about his actual commitment to “investigative journalism”. After serious investigation, Mr Harkin apparently arrived at the insightful conclusion that the bombers were targeting Ariana Grande’s “revealing stage outfits, her stockings, pink bunny ears and unabashed sexual confidence”. From his work in Syria and his studies of the Koran, Harkin has decided that Islamic extremists have no problem with western governments – their target is “Godless Western decadence” and “the values we all live by.” Do they include pink bunny ears, I wonder?

Drone strikes

Creating terrorists

Well, I’m sorry, Mr Harkin, but you’re wrong. If you haven’t learned the term Asymmetric warfare it’s time you did. It is defined as “war between belligerents whose relative military power differs significantly, or whose strategy or tactics differ significantly. This is typically a war between a standing, professional army and an insurgency or resistance movement.” In other words, George W Bush (and Margaret Thatcher before him) conclusively proved to all the world that confronting the military might of a technologically advanced Western power could only ever have one result. The Boers in South Africa, the Irish republicans, and a hundred other aggrieved, embattled but fiercely determined minority groups have shown that, in their desperation, they can inflict terrible damage. I don’t believe those Manchester bombers really wanted to “slaughter innocent little girls clutching pink balloons on a night out with their mothers at a pop concert”. They would prefer to hit the true war criminals who are hiding safely behind impenetrable layers of security. Unable to get at the political leaders, they commit random acts of terror with the aim of persuading ordinary citizens to pressure their own governments to stop the state terror they are inflicting on innocent people in faraway lands.

Which brings me to the question of cowardice. Another article in my beloved NZ Herald rightly took issue with British politicians calling the Manchester attack an act of cowardice. No one who condones the murdering of innocent civilians in distant countries using unmanned drones or mother-f**king MOABs can claim the moral high ground and call anyone else a coward. Where I part company with the writer is when she says, I don’t believe that’s an act of cowardice. It’s an utterly terrifying and fearless act of self-destruction fuelled by a desire to kill as many as possible, and all in the name of spreading this warped, brutal and extremist ideology.”

Pai marire

Taking on the British Empire, 1865 – What odds would you give?

Rachel the journalist just doesn’t get it. These people are not out to spread an ideology, though they must surely be fearless and desirous of killing as many as possible. They are fearless because they have lost hope. In the 1860s in New Zealand, a kind of religion emerged among Maori people on the East Coast. Known as Pai Marire, or sometimes Hauhauism, it was a mixture of Christian and traditional spiritual beliefs. Atrocities were certainly committed against white settlers by its adherents. When they ran into hopeless battle against government forces, warriors chanted a kind of prayer, Hapa, hapa, paimarire hau, which they believed gave them immunity from bullets.

Did they really believe that? Were they really fearless? Did they really want to eat the eyeballs of their victims, as some reportedly did? I suspect not. They had lost their land; they were losing their culture, their language and their pride. In their own minds, what was there to live for? But they were angry too, and wanted to vent that anger. So they would take as many others with them as possible when they journeyed to the next world.

Maori novelist Witi Ihımaera, in a short story exploring the issue of Maori pride and sense of loss, ended with the words “No wai te he?” “Who is to blame?” The old man in the story didn’t know the answer – but we, if we are honest, certainly do. More MOABs and drone strikes in the Middle East won’t end the terror.

France joins USA in Hypocrisy Champions League

24Raids-web-master768

Turkey or France? – Circle the correct answer

I’m happy to see Amnesty International picking on the French government for a change, as their new president seeks to extend his country’s State of Emergency for a SIXTH term since December 2015.

I found a report in our English language daily, Hürriyet Daily News but a quick Google search failed to turn up coverage in any mainstream Western media. They much prefer attacking Turkey, and accusing its democratically elected President of being a dictator.

Disproportionate restrictions on demonstrations under the State of Emergency in France reveals that hundreds of unjustified measures restricting freedom of movement and the right to peaceful assembly have been issued under the guise of countering terrorism.

“Emergency laws intended to protect the French people from the threat of terrorism are instead being used to restrict their rights to protest peacefully,” said Marco Perolini, Amnesty International’s researcher on France.

“Under the cover of the state of emergency, rights to protest have been stripped away with hundreds of activists, environmentalists, and labour rights campaigners unjustifiably banned from participating in protests.”

image

Well, neither girl is wearing a red dress – but still . . .

Following the horrific Paris attacks on 13 November 2015, France’s state of emergency, introduced a day later, has been renewed five times normalizing a range of intrusive measures. These include powers to ban demonstrations on vague grounds and prevent individuals attending protests. Last week, President Macron indicated that he will ask parliament to extend it for a sixth time.

The state of emergency allows prefects to ban any gathering as a precautionary measure on very broad and undefined grounds of ‘threat to public order’. These powers to restrict the right to freedom of peaceful assembly have frequently been used disproportionately.

Between November 2015 and 5 May 2017, authorities used emergency powers to issue 155 decrees prohibiting public assemblies, in addition to banning dozens of protests using ordinary French law. They also imposed 639 measures preventing specific individuals participating in public assemblies. Of these, 574 were targeted at those protesting against proposed labour law reforms. Moreover, according to media reports, authorities imposed dozens of similar measures to prevent people from participating in protests after the second round of the presidential elections on 7 May.

Turkish NGO provides education for refugee children in makeshift tents

n_113386_1I’m passing this on from Turkey’s English language Hürriyet Daily News:

The Imece Initiative, a non-governmental organization working mostly with Syrian refugees in the western province of İzmir, has started to provide education for refugee children who do not have access to school, by setting up makeshift tents.

As part of the “Makeshift Tent” project, the NGO has been visiting various regions and villages where Syrian agricultural workers mostly live five days of the week, setting up tents in these places. Thanks to the organization’s workshops the children are learning how to read and write in Turkish and Arabic.

The NGO has been active for the last three months in the Çamanönü village in İzmir’s Menderes district. About 180 Syrian families live in the village, where greenhouse cultivation has also been initiated intensively. 

The refugee children wait anxiously every Saturday morning for a bus of the NGO people to come to their village. 

While some of the NGO workers set up the tents, others dress themselves up as clowns to play with the kids. 

CAIMA501-Mideast-Out-Of-SchAbout 30 children aged between seven and 12 sit around a table set up in a field of olive trees, where two NGO volunteers give Turkish and Arabic language classes. 

The children have been receiving education in this tent for the last three months and have almost mastered the two languages. Apart from language education, the children are also given mathematics lessons. They have also improved their motor skills thanks to workshops on handcrafts and painting.

“Since the kids know that we come every Saturday, they wake up early in the morning and ask their mothers to dress them up in their nicest clothes. When they see us arriving in the village, they come running to us. We have been coming for the last three months and holding workshops for the kids. Every time we come, we see more kids,” Imece Initiative workers said.

n_92704_1“Since most of them were born in Turkey, they have never seen a school. First, we conduct painting workshops for the younger children. Later, we give Turkish and mathematics lessons to children aged between seven and 12,” said Ali Güray Yalvaçlı, head of the Imece Initiative Foundation.

“To ensure continuity, we are always in contact with the families. For example, a family who is in Menderes this week can be lreocated to the Torbalı district next week. Wherever the kids go, we go there,” he said.

Read the article

Wheels within wheels – Some thoughts on espionage, money-laundering and Christian missionaries

Turkey’s President Erdoğan has just returned from a visit to Washington where he and President Trump apparently “agreed to disagree” over the issue of American support for Kurdish YPG fighters in Syria.

n_113280_4

Brett McGurk, U.S. special envoy to the coalition against ISIL speaking with PKK militants currently being sought by Turkey through Interpol

Spokespersons for the US State department have openly admitted supporting and supplying weapons to the YPG, which Ankara claims has close links with the separatist Kurdish terrorist organisation, PKK. Jonathan Cohen, deputy assistant secretary for European and Asian Affairs (high level stuff!) is quoted as saying The relationship between the United States and the Syrian Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) is a temporary, transactional and tactical one. We are in this common [fight] to defeat a terrorist organization in Iraq and Syria. We have the YPG because they were the only force on the ground ready to act in the short term. We have not promised the YPG anything.”

  • Main US tactic: Delegate an underling (in this case, a “deputy assistant secretary”) to tell the big lies. Then later you can deny responsibility.
  • Second tactic: A “temporary, transactional and tactical” relationship. Remember how the US had a similar relationship with the Taliban in Afghanistan to get rid of Russia? If the Kurdish separatists trust the US government, they’ll be in for a sad shock in future. In the mean time, the US is seriously upsetting a loyal ally (Turkey).
  • First big lie: “The YPG were the only force on the ground etc”. Turkey’s government has offered full cooperation to the US in combatting ISIS/ISIL/Daesh.
  • Second big lie: “We have not promised the YPG anything.” If you believe that, you’ll believe anything! The US government has been cooperating with and assisting Kurdish groups for years – for example enlisting them to help get rid of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Of course they are offering support for an independent Kurdistan.

So, Mr Erdoğan came back from Washington pretty disappointed. He did, however, more than hold his own in the handshaking competition:

What about Mr Trump? Apparently he asked Turkey’s government to “immediately release” the jailed American pastor Andrew Brunson. Brunson was arrested in December last year on a charge of “being part of a terrorist organisation.” He allegedly has connections to the Fethullahist Terror Organization (FETÖ), and used his missionary activities to incite Kurdish separatist activities.

Assange

Human rights – for who?

The US government would also dearly like to get their hands on Julian Assange and Edward Snowden – key players in the Wikileaks revelations that caused serious embarrassment over American actions in Iraq and elsewhere. The governments of Ecuador and Russia are kindly looking after those two gentlemen who fear that their democratic rights may count for little if the US government gets hold of them. In fact, that is pretty much confirmed by the latest news on Assange. It seems Swedish authorities have dropped their rape case against him – but the Brits say they will still arrest him as soon as he steps out of the Ecuadorean Embassy. Acting in their established role as America’s lapdog, they will probably then hand him over to the Yanks, who still want him. So now we understand the real situation, if we didn’t before.

Turkey’s government, for its part, wants the US to extradite ex-pat Muslim imam, Fethullah Gülen, who they say was a key figure in the 15 July coup attempt last year. They have also been asking the Greek government to hand over eight Turkish soldiers who took refuge in Greece after the failure of the coup. Now it seems Angela Merkel’s government is getting involved, granting political asylum to two Turkish generals known to have been active in the coup attempt, as well as several hundred Turkish military personnel.

Adding to the confusion, two Turkish citizens are currently on trial in the United States on charges of money laundering and conspiring to violate US trade sanctions against Iran. Wealthy businessman, Reza Zarrab, who is also a citizen of Iran, and Mehmet Hakan Atilla, assistant general manager of Turkey’s Halkbank are in custody in New York. Interestingly, they are being defended by American lawyers, one of whom is former mayor of New York City, Rudolph Giuliani, whose firm also represents the US banks implicated in the case. In another twist, the judge has implied that the Turkish government is paying legal expenses for the two – though why that should concern him, I don’t understand – and anyway, the lawyers have stated that the two guys are paying their own costs.

Needless to say, President Erdoğan has added his voice to the discussion, asking that his two citizens be returned to Turkey. Amidst all the uproar, no one seems to be asking why the US imposed sanctions on Iran in the first place, and why Turkey should continue to suffer economically after loyally supporting America’s wishes in the matter for nearly forty years!

Getting back to the business of Andrew Brunson. Apparently he was/is involved with an organisation calling itself the Izmir Resurrection Church. According to their website: İzmir is the third largest city in Turkey and also the Biblical Smyrna. It has more churches than any city except İstanbul and unity between them has the potential to reap a great harvest. Now, for the towns and villages of Izmir!

There’s no greater testimony than a radiant Turkish believer, passionate to reach out.”

Related to the IRC is an outfit entitled The Bible Correspondence Course running an operation they call The 1881 Project. “Turkey,” they say, “is home to 75 million people who are both strongly nationalistic as well as loyal to their Islamic identity. But the truth of Jesus Christ and His sacrifice remains virtually unknown in what Operation World calls ‘the most unevangelised country in the world’.”

bible

Do Muslims really need to hear that?

“Since 1 July 2011, the Bible Correspondence Course is running an exciting 18 month initiative to challenge all of Turkey’s 81 provinces to consider the claims of Christ. Working together with local believers and churches from all over the world, we believe it is time to declare to every province in Turkey that a Savior has been born to them – a Son has been given to them. In more than a third of Turkey’s 81 provinces there is no meeting of believers and many have no known believer whatsoever.”

A Canadian mate of Brunson’s, David Byle, has also been involved in an ongoing legal battle with Turkish authorities who suspect him of being a threat to national security. This gentleman has been sounding off to another interesting organisation working under the name of World Watch Monitor. These people apparently have taken upon themselves the responsibility of reporting “the story of Christians around the world under pressure for their faith.” They love to cite the UN Declaration of Human Rights which guarantees among other things, “freedom of religion.”

Well, Turkish law does indeed permit freedom of religious belief, and does not forbid missionary activity. It is, however, a predominantly Muslim country. Although, unlike other Muslim states, it allows its Muslim citizens freedom to change their religion, its authorities are obliged to recognise that some devout citizens may not take a favourable view of public proselytising by tub-thumping Christians.

DSCN8006

Believe what you like, but keep it to yourself!

Furthermore, Christian missionaries in the past have given Muslim Turks some cause to be suspicious of their activities. Generally speaking, it is rare for a Muslim to convert to Christianity. Islam recognises that Jesus Christ was a prophet of God, and accepts Christians as “People of the Book” – but insists that Muhammed was the last prophet, bringing God’s final message. So why should they switch to what is, in their view, a more backward religion?

Consequently, Christian missionaries, mostly American, operating in Anatolia during the 19th century, tended to work among the Armenian community – who were already Christians. Ottoman authorities believed that they had an ulterior purpose: that they were trying to stir up discontent and incite rebellion against the Ottoman government. When such rebellions were forcefully put down, the same missionaries were conveniently on hand to report Ottoman atrocities against their Christian subjects, providing a pretext for Western governments to intervene on behalf of their “co-religionists”.

Which brings us to important questions about freedom and democracy:

  • Does the United States government have the right to force other countries to suffer social and economic hardships to support their foreign policies?
  • Does the United States Government have the right to demand the handing over to its own judicial system the citizens of other sovereign nations?
  • Are the authorities in Turkey required to forget what happened on July 15, 2016, forgive its citizens who tried to overthrow the democratically elected government by force of arms, and act as though nothing out of the ordinary happened?
  • Do foreign governments have the right to question the legal process in Turkey and give asylum to Turkish citizens who may have committed criminal acts of treason?
  • Does the right to freedom of religion imply the right to make a protracted public nuisance of yourself, requiring local authorities to protect you from the righteous anger of their own offended citizens?

I have my answers to these important questions. What about you?

Why should Turkey be first?

we-dont-live-in-a-democracy-we-live-in-a-hypocrisy-quote-1What would you say to an online news outlet founded by an Arab-American entrepreneur based in Washington DC who also happened to be president and chairman of an investment company set up to help companies secure reconstruction contracts in Iraq? What if the guy had close ties to the Bush family and both Bush administrations? If he was, in fact, a friend and business partner of former president George W. Bush’s brother Neil, and a “major contributor” to the presidential campaigns of both George Bushes, father and son? Would alarm bells ring if you knew he had been involved in the founding of Syria’s ruling (minority) Ba’ath Party, and was a strong supporter of beleaguered dictator, Bashar Assad? If his biography boasted that he had “over thirty years of experience managing investments in oil and gas, telecommunications, high technology, media, manufacturing and real estate”?

Would it colour your assessment if you learned that major contributors to the website included former top-level people in the US State Department and the CIA? That it is an “invaluable” source of information for The Wall Street Journal, Time Magazine, The New York Times and The Economist?

That’s a sample of what I turned up when I went searching for background on the Al-Monitor website and its founder, Jamal Daniel. Check him out for yourself: Counterpunch, Mediabiasfactcheck, Tabletmag.com

Well, pardon my cynicism, but when I read an article on that site taking Turkey’s government to task for its failure to address the issue of climate change, I wanted to laugh out loud! A big noise in the fossil fuel industry, major financial backer of GH (The American way of life is not up for negotiations”) Bush, funding criticism of a developing country for its “misguided energy policies”?

energy-sources-german-2016-1The article compared Turkey’s electricity generation unfavourably with that of Germany which, allegedly, produces far more power from solar energy under its its cold, cloudy skies. Well, I took a look at figures for electricity generation in Germany. The latest I could find were for 2016. If my arithmetic is correct, the Germans are producing 52.7% from fossil fuel sources, and a further 13.1% from nuclear plants. Admittedly they claim 29% is based on renewable sources, but that includes hydro.

Turkey, for comparison, according to the latest figures, produces over 40% from renewable sources, and 58% from coal and natural gas. Well, it’s not ideal, for sure, but I don’t see anything for the Germans to be particularly self-righteous about. And in fact Turkey’s government is actively encouraging the development of wind and solar electricity generation. Click the links if you’re interested (sorry if you can’t read Turkish):

Wind energy    Solar energy

US-States-and-Economies-with-Similar-GDPs-2015

And still they’re poisoning the planet!

And what about the United States? Again, I couldn’t find the latest figures, but in 2014 the principal sources of US electricity were: coal (39%), natural gas (27%), nuclear (19%), Hydro (6%), and other renewables (7%). Do the maths. 66% fossil fuels and 19% nuclear. No wonder the developing world is not interested in listening to the pious pontificating of American “environmentalists”. Physician, heal thyself! And have a go at China if you are sincere in your desire to clean up Planet Earth!

Another article that appeared on the same Al-Monitor site launched intoTurkey’s skyrocketing welfare spending”. The writer quoted figures showing that “welfare assistance to the poor” had increased from 1.3 billion Turkish Liras in 2002 to 33.7 billion TL by 2016 – the period in which the country has been governed by RT Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party. The essence of the argument seemed to be that the government’s social welfare programme had become “a major instrument to lure and control voters”.

windmills in turkey

Wind turbines in Turkey

Well, leave aside that the writer’s computational skills seem not up to the task of converting raw data to a percentage – and the fact that Al-Monitor locates Turkey unequivocally in the Middle East. It may be that Throughout Turkey’s Republican history, no other government” has channelled so much money into social welfare programmes – but I have to tell you, that cash was sorely needed. Turkey was governed for decades by a socio-economic elite that allowed the majority of the population to languish in underdeveloped ignorance, staging regular military coups every ten years when the democratic process threatened their hold on power.

These days Turkey has a working egalitarian health system that most Americans would envy if they knew about it. The public sector has been upgraded so that personnel are educated and trained, and offices are modern and well equipped. You make appointments on the internet and there is no longer any need to bribe your way through the bureaucratic process. State retirement pensions are regularly increased in line with single-digit inflation, and paid automatically on time.

Such methods, I agree, may not be in line with IMF and World bank guidelines that aim to embroil developing countries in increasing unpayable debt before forcing “belt-tightening” austerity measures on reluctant governments. But hey! Hands up who envies the Greeks their current economic mess.

Turkey’s opposition, we are told, “is at a loss and unable to come up with a counterstrategy other than pledging to give out more, which seems to have had little effect so far. In short, the government’s policy of vote hunting through welfare assistance remains without an alternative in Turkey. As a result, the votes of millions remain hostage to the aid they receive and continue to sway elections.”

Well, that’s one way of looking at it. Take your socialist ideas of helping the poor too far and you may end up like Venezuela – your economy in tatters despite having the world’s second largest proven oil reserves. Uncle Sam’s got his eye on you!

So, it seems, in the eyes of the West, Turkey should be setting an example to the rest of the world:

  • Stop generating electricity until you can do it all using renewable resources. And hydro’s not acceptable if it means using water, or flooding areas that may contain places of historical interest (just about everywhere in Turkey!).
  • Front up and admit to having genocided innocent Armenians – and pay large reparations. Maybe the USA will follow suit and pay up for genociding its indigenous people; and join with the Brits in recompensing descendants of the African slaves who kick-started their industrial development. And the French will atone for killing 1.5 million Algerians.
  • Stop whining about that attempted military coup last July. Forgive and forget! Maybe those people did try to overthrow the democratically elected government using tanks and machine guns – but come on! That’s just freedom of expression, isn’t it? Nothing to hold a grudge over.
  • Stop trying to modernise your country and compete with the giants of the industrial world. Accept your fate as a backward Third World has-been, and be happy.
  • Keep crawling on your knees to the European Union, whose leaders have no intention of ever admitting you to their club. Do everything they tell you to do, and persist in a pathetic, trusting naïveté that one day they’ll let you in.
  • Accept your role as sanctuary for the millions of refugees fleeing from the civil war in Syria. Police your borders so none of them can escape to Western Europe to threaten the comfort of our complacent, privileged lifestyles.

Have I missed anything? If you have any more useful advice to give Turkey’s government, please feel free to set your own house in order first. Then they may start to take you seriously.

Solving the world’s problems – Different strokes for different folks

Tomahawk-míssil-disparado+de+destróier

Another creative response from the United States.

project-3815-body-13048067_461196257424031_6820238524470842579_o

Meanwhile, Turkey gets on with the job of dealing with 3 million refugees,

2C60D9E500000578-3238047-image-a-14_1442476075839

and the European Union lends a helping hand.

According to the US Department of Defence’s annual budget, a single Tomahawk missile costs $1.59 million.

Combine that by the 59 missiles the US ordered to be fired off two warships in the Mediterranean Sea, and you’re looking at a bill of around $94 million. (Source)

And that’s not counting the cost of keeping a fleet of warships in the Mediterranean Sea. Why don’t they do something about poverty, health, education and equal opportunities in their own country?

080417TOMAHAWKonline

While the Tomahawk isn’t as devastating as some of the missiles carried on board manned aircraft, it is typically used when Western nations [especially the USA] want a long-range weapon that can be fired from safe territory.

But it seems the US Government is actually proud of what they’ve done:

“The United States blasted a Syrian air base with a barrage of cruise missiles Friday afternoon in fiery retaliation for this week’s gruesome chemical weapons attack against civilians.

President Donald Trump cast the US assault as vital to deter future use of poison gas and called on other nations to join in seeking “to end the slaughter and bloodshed in Syria.”

A Homs governor has told the Associated Press that the missile attack at the Syrian base has resulted in deaths. Reuters reports six Syrian soldiers were killed and seven wounded at the air base.

Russia responded, saying the US strike on Syria is “aggression against a sovereign state” and violates international law,” reported AP.

Probably the only thing that will stop Russia from supporting Syria militarily is the likelihood that the US government will nuke them if they do.

_________________________________________________

PS – 100 tonnes of bombs and they only killed 6 people. Now there’s a precision strike for you!