America cannot be trusted to run global economy

Turkey’s President Erdoğan has been copping plenty of flak from opposition at home and abroad recently. So what’s new? He’s been dealing with negativity, black propaganda, outright lies, a period of imprisonment and at least one attempted military coup for more than twenty years – so I guess for him it’s just business as usual.

Recep+Tayyip+Erdogan+G20+Nations+Hold+Hamburg+oF8eiMsk5dWl

Interestingly, Frau Merkel and M. Macron seem to be offering support these days!

After being re-elected as president, with increased powers under the new constitution, Mr Erdoğan appointed a new cabinet, as he is now entitled to do. Most of his appointments were relatively uncontroversial – but one has aroused considerable criticism and mockery: the choice of his son-in-law, Berat Albayrak, as Treasury and Finance Minister.

Well, certainly, it’s not a good look, especially since the gentleman concerned is only 37 years old; but I’m withholding judgment at this stage. For sure, young Mr Albayrak has a difficult road ahead. His age, for a start. He’ll be dealing with much older, more experienced, hard-headed businessmen (and women) all too ready to latch on to any sign of weakness. His father-in-law, for seconds. He has to live down the perception that he only got the job because of Baba Tayyip. Worst of all, though, is the fact that Turkey’s economy is going through a particularly hard time, with the Turkish Lira dropping to scary lows against the world’s big currencies – with an inevitable flow-on effect to internal prices.

Whatever you may think about President Erdoğan, I am sure few would deny that he is a very astute politician. His party came to power in 2003 after decades of hyper-inflation, regular military coups, and outrageous corruption in business and politics. They have won election after election – and Mr Erdoğan makes no secret of his desire to be at the country’s helm in 2023 when the Republic of Turkey celebrates its centenary. He wants to go down in history as the best thing to happen to his young nation since Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

So, in my opinion, he’s not going to pick a dodo as Finance Minister at this critical time. He knows that much of his reputation in future will depend on his last years in office, maybe more than the earlier years; and his success (or failure) in bringing his country through the current financial crisis could be the crucial factor in determining how the history books will view his achievements.

So, what has the new Finance Minister got to say for himself? This report appeared the other day in Hürriyet Daily News:

America cannot be trusted to run global economy: Albayrak

Albayrak

After all, he’s about the same age as the President of France, and the Prime Ministers of Canada and New Zealand – and father-in-law’s got his back

The assault on Turkey’s economy must be viewed as an example of how the senseless use of economic pressure as a political weapon poses serious global risks, Turkey’s treasury and finance minister has said.

“By acting together with Turkey now, other countries can also help it create a common strategy to avoid artificial crises in the future,” Berat Albayrak wrote in an article titled ‘America Can’t Be Trusted to Run the Global Economy’ for the American news magazine Foreign Policy published on Sept. 7.

“This August, Turkey’s economy became the main topic in global news coverage. The reason was a systematic attack on the Turkish economy by the biggest player in the global economic system, the United States. It was one of the most disappointing moments in the history of the alliance between Turkey and America,” Albayrak said, accusing the Trump administration of overtly attacking the economy of a fellow NATO member through sanctions and tariffs.

Albayrak underlined that while the scale of the attack resulted in exchange rate fluctuations, the incident ultimately demonstrated the strong fundamentals of the Turkish economy.

“In the face of all the negative propaganda, and the attacks on its financial system, the Turkish economy has demonstrated its strength. It is important to reiterate that no economic indicators or macroeconomic data can account for the devaluation of the Turkish lira over the past month. Turkey’s financial structure and banking system have not experienced any fundamental changes during this time,” he said.

Turkish Central Bank’s independence 

Albayrak pointed to Turkey’s commitment to create an investor-friendly environment in an effort to take steps to address several economic weaknesses to prevent potential future vulnerabilities. He said the Turkish Central Bank’s independence, effectiveness and leading role in monetary policy would remain a priority for the government as it has been for the last 16 years. Albayrak said contrary to what some suggested, “it is not on our agenda to go to the International Monetary Fund”.

“Turkey will continue to secure foreign currency reserves from international markets as it has until now. Our goal is to ensure that Turkey continues to attract foreign direct investment and become a center for innovation and research and development for the global economy,” he added.

Albayrak said the U.S. attack on the Turkish economy also increased Turkey’s determination to strengthen its economy through structural reforms, new trade partnerships and the attraction of foreign investments and to take steps to rebalance the structure of the international economy so that powerful countries like the U.S. no longer would have the power to unilaterally disrupt the economic life of others.

Underlining the fact that Turkey never implemented rules that run counter to market principles, Albayrak said: “No crisis or financial assault can weaken Turkey’s commitment to those principles.”

‘Turkey not only country targeted by U.S.’ 

Albayrak pointed out that Turkey was not the only country that the U.S. recently targeted with sanctions under political pretexts.

“The single-handed exercise of tariffs by the United States against its trade partners in Europe, Russia and China proved that international trade, cooperation and stability should be secured by a stronger alliance among nations around the world and may necessitate taking countersteps to prevent catastrophic damage to the global financial system and international trade.”

Albayrak said the world faces incredibly complex challenges and Washington’s economic threats were a significant subset of those challenges.

“Unilateral sanctions, incitement of trade wars and haphazard use of economic weapons could potentially trigger another global economic crisis. At this critical juncture, developed and developing economies around the world need to promote strong and institutionalized cooperation to handle potential crises and financial attacks.

‘Cooperation, solidarity between Turkey, EU revived’ 

Albayrak said the Turkish government has been pleased to see promising new opportunities for the future of the international economy amid this artificial crisis created by the United States.

“Our European friends, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron, have made statements that clearly indicate they understand that Washington’s approach was dangerous and mistaken. The spirit of cooperation and solidarity between Turkey and the European Union has thus been revived, having proved critical for the political and economic well-being of both sides,” he added.

Albayrak highlighted that Turkey has been at the forefront of dealing with significant threats against Western countries for more than six decades.

“In recent years, this has included the fight against terrorist organizations such as al-Qaeda and the so-called Islamic State. During this period, Turkey has become a hope for millions of refugees running away from the brutal regime in Syria and the target of terrorist organizations that want to expand the war in that country to the West,” Albayrak said, adding that Turkey became an island of stability in one of the most unstable regions of the world.

In adopting sanctions against Turkey, the Trump administration invoked the flimsy pretext of an ongoing legal case involving a U.S. citizen with strong links to terrorist activities targeting Turkey’s peace and stability. The effects of the U.S. decision were nevertheless dramatic, with the Turkish economy experiencing immediate fluctuations. Referring to Andrew Craig Brunson, a U.S. pastor who is under house arrest in Turkey over terrorism charges, Albayrak said, “Washington’s brazen use of economic weapons served as a wakeup call for many countries and investors around the world. It was recognized as risky not only for the future of the alliance between Turkey and the United States but also for global markets.”

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Europe should react to US sanctions targeting Turkey, China, Russia: German FM

Germany’s foreign minister on Aug. 27 criticized U.S. President Donald Trump for imposing sanctions against trade partners like Turkey, China and Russia.

Heiko MaasSpeaking at the annual Ambassadors’ Conference in Berlin, Heiko Maas vowed to take measures to protect European firms from such unilateral sanctions.

“Washington’s sanctions policy forces us Europeans to formulate a response. Because it is affecting us, Germany and Europe, when the U.S. abruptly and unilaterally imposing often unspecified sanctions against Russia, China, Turkey and maybe in the future against our other important trading partners,” he stressed.

Maas argued that the European Union member states should take joint steps against the U.S. dominance in global finance, and proposed a European alternative to the U.S.-dominated SWIFT payment system.

“We have to further strengthen the autonomy and sovereignty of Europe in the fields of trade, economy and finance policies,” he stressed.

“It’s not going to be easy but we have already started working on it. We are working on proposals to establish independent payment channels and creating a European Monetary Fund,” he added.

Maas is scheduled to visit Turkey next month to discuss bilateral ties and regional issues.

During his two-day visit on Sept. 5-6, Heiko Maas is expected to meet his Turkish counterpart Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu and other senior officials in the capital Ankara.

Later the two top diplomats will travel to Istanbul for a celebration at the city’s German School marking its 150th anniversary.

Maas’ trip to Turkey comes ahead of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s key visit to Germany on Sept. 28-29.

Over the past two years political relations between Ankara and Berlin have suffered setbacks, but in recent months both sides have taken steps towards improving ties.

EU heavyweight Germany remains Turkey’s main economic and trade partner, despite political disagreements between the governments on a number of issues.

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/europe-should-react-to-us-sanctions-targeting-turkey-china-turkey-german-fm-136189

http://english.almanar.com.lb/568742

Open admission of US guilt!

Do you need further evidence that the “money markets”, transnational bankers and financiers, and the “credit agencies” are in cahoots with the United States Government, and vice versa?

US-Turkey crisis could end “instantly” if pastor freed: Bolton

Turkey could end the crisis with the United States “instantly” by freeing a detained American pastor, President Donald Trump’s national security adviser said, adding that a Qatari cash infusion would not help Ankara’s economy.

John Bolton

Do you REALLY want me to say that, Don?

“Look, the Turkish government made a big mistake in not releasing Pastor Brunson,” Bolton told Reuters in an interview during a visit to Israel.

“Every day that goes by that mistake continues, this crisis could be over instantly if they did the right thing as a NATO ally, part of the West, and release pastor Brunson without condition.”

Qatar’s Emir this month approved a package of economic projects, including a $15 billion pledge of support, for Turkey, giving a boost to a lira that has lost some 37 percent of its value this year.

Bolton was skeptical about the intervention by the Gulf state, which has been feuding with U.S. allies in the Middle East such as Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Egypt.

“Well, I think what they pledged is utterly insufficient to have an impact on Turkey’s economy. It’s certainly not helpful but we’ll actually see what develops from their pledge,” he said.

__________________________________________

So, either the US Government ordered the financiers to punish Turkey, or more likely, the financiers ordered the government. And it’s not just Turkey! In the past, however, the US would deny responsibility, and blame the target country’s inefficient management etc – which, of course, they are still trying to do. The importance of Turkey for the world, in terms of democracy and national sovereignty, is that they are forcing out into the open what the United States is doing – and has been doing for decades!

It is also clear that the US Government does not want the Brunson case to come to court in Turkey. Why not? Are they afraid that his connections with the CIA will become public knowledge?

And furthermore, the Trump administration seems to be calling for Turkey’s government to interfere in the judicial process. Isn’t that one of the things that Turkey is being criticised for?

_________________________________

Bolton remarks proof US targeting Turkey in economic war

President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s spokesperson said on Aug. 22 remarks by the U.S. National Security Adviser regarding Turkey’s economic situation were proof that the U.S. administration is targeting a NATO ally as part of an economic war.

İbrahim Kalın

Turkey’s presidential spokesperson, İbrahim Kalın

In a written statement responding to an interview whichJohnBoltongave to Reuters, [the presidential] spokesperson İbrahim Kalın said the U.S. administration’s most recent policies were at odds with the fundamental principles and values of the NATO alliance.

Turkey and the United States are embroiled in a deep dispute focused on a U.S. pastor, Andrew Brunson, being tried on terrorism charges in Turkey. The row has fuelled a slide in the lira, which has lost more than a third of its value against the dollar this year.

“The Trump administration has … established that it intends to use trade, tariffs and sanctions to start a global trade war,” he said, pointing to similar disputes with Mexico, Canada, Europe and China.

“Turkey has no intention of starting an economic war with any party. It cannot, however, be expected to keep silent in the face of attacks against its economy and judiciary,” he said.

Kalın said Turkey would work with the rest of the world against restrictive and punitive measures.

“The U.S. administration’s most recent policies are at odds with the fundamental principles and values of the NATO alliance,” he added.

________________________________

This opinion piece by Murat Yetkin makes some important points:

Is it OK for the West if there is a coup in Turkey?

[O]n Aug. 22, Trump’s National Security Adviser John Bolton told Reuters in Jerusalem “the Turkish government made a big mistake in not releasing Brunson” and “this crisis could be over instantly if they did the right thing as a NATO ally, part of the West and release the pastor without condition.”

This is arrogant and vague language, which could be used against an enemy or a rival but not an “ally.” What kind of a deal Bolton is talking about is also unclear. If “the government,” not the court would release Brunson, does Bolton mean all subjects of crisis, from Gülen to the U.S. support of PKK offshoots in Syria, would be over “instantly”?

The U.S. and NATO have turned a blind eye on the coups inTurkeyin 1960, 1971 and 1980; [or] have supported and shed crocodile tears as long asTurkey served Western military interests. That was the Cold War. It is no excuse, but the U.S. priority then was to be against the Soviet Union, which has now been succeeded by the Russian Federation.

Is this hypocrisy still valid? Is it OK for the West if there is a coup in Turkey, as long as it serves their military interests?

Trump’s Turkey policy self-defeating, Turkish FM says

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu has described President Donald Trump’s recent policy targeting Ankara as “self-defeating,” while reminding the “critical” role of İncirlik Air Base in Turkey.

mevlüt çavuşoğlu

Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu

“Aiming to undermine an ally’s economy to score domestic political points is deeply misguided. Alienating an ally with which your country shares vital national interests is self-defeating,” Çavuşoğlu said in an opinion article for USA Today on Aug. 20.

After reminding Turkey’s key roles inside NATO, Çavuşoğlu said: “The economic sanctions Mr. Trump’s administration is imposing on Turkey, however, are poised to disrupt any atmosphere of cooperation — all while global threats demand that we strengthen, not weaken, the ties that bind us together.”

Çavuşoğlu counted Syria and the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS) as two key areas of cooperation between the two countries. 

“Turkey’s İncirlik Air Base hosts American troops who are serving on the frontlines of the fight against ISIS. It has been a critical staging ground, putting allied forces hours closer than other bases in the region and has made a substantial difference in the ability to successfully root out ISIS,” he added.

Turkey is not a “rogue regime that can be shaken down on a whim,” Çavuşoğlu said, slamming Trump’s decision to double U.S. tariffs on a number of Turkish products, while imposing sanctions on two Turkish ministers over the arrest of Pastor Andrew Brunson.

“This reckless escalation needs to stop. The U.S. and Turkey may have divergent views on significant issues, but we strategically align on a wide range of others. For everyone’s sake, we should address our disagreements with diplomacy, rather than threats and provocation, and with a commitment to facts and perspective,” he concluded.

The article comes as ties between Ankara and Washington are in an unprecedented crisis over the continued detention of Brunson.

U.S. administration had imposed sanctions and vows to do more against Turkey in the case the pastor would not be released immediately.

Source

Thanks to Trump, Turkey is not alone

Extracts from an opinion piece by Murat Yetkin

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Turkish guy facing down a tank at Istanbul’s Atatürk Airport – July 16, 2016

Does the U.S. president really, sincerely think the actions and sanctions against Turkey will work? They did not work against Iraq in the 1990s. Iraq could be put down through military action. They did not work in the 2000s against Russia, who even grew strong enough to influence the U.S. elections.

It is something favorable if Turkey and the U.S. are on good terms, with better cooperation and mutual respect, but . . . Turkey does not owe its existence to the U.S. and will not cease to exist without it.

Trump’s actions and sanctions on the Turkish economy . . . not only have had a rally-around-the-flag effect (as anyone who has read a bit of political history would guess) but have also told the Turkish people they have friends around the world who care for them.

miltary-coup-turkey-cnn-1

CNN news coverage on the night of the attempted coup. So was it staged? Who were the US supporting?

Be it in their own interest or by seizing an opportunity to say something against Trump’s policies, which bother many economies from China to the European Union, voices have been raised by those who have taken a stand with Turkey. Before this currency crisis, there were only a few of them; Azerbaijan and Qatar . . . the most loyal of them.

However, right after Trump started to use American economic power as a political tool against Turkey, not only Russia, Iran and China have chosen to speak out against the U.S., but European NATO allies like Germany and Italy have also started to lobby for Turkey.

Qatar pledges $15 billion investment

Qatar’s Emir Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani paid a snap visit to the Turkish capital on Aug. 15 for talks with Erdoğan after a phone exchange the two men held late Aug. 13. Bilateral relations and regional developments were discussed in the working lunch that took more than three hours. The Emir pledged a direct investment worth $15 billion to Turkey, a presidential source said.

Qatar meeting

Qatar’s and Turkey’s leaders meeting over lunch

“We attach importance to his visit. This visit, at the same time, is an indicator that Qatar stands with Turkey,” Presidential Spokesman İbrahim Kalın told reporters at a press conference on Aug. 15.

In a written statement, on the day Emir al-Thani paid a visit to Ankara, Qatar’s Ambassador to Turkey Saleem Mubarak al-Shafi reiterated his country’s support to the Turkish government.

“Just like during the defeated coup attempt in 2016, Qatar is the first country rushing to help its Turkish brothers and we will continue to stand with them,” the ambassador said. Underlining that his country has already expressed that it was ready to assist Turkey in this period, al-Shafi informed that the Qatari people have bought liras worth millions of dollars in direct support to the Turkish economy.

Turkey and Qatar enjoy a unique relationship in the region. Turkey, which has a military base in Qatar, rushed supplies to the Gulf state after Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt imposed a boycott in 2017.

Erdoğan spoke with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in the late afternoon on Aug. 15, after the latter has openly backed Turkey in its row with the U.S. that brought about political and economic sanctions. He will talk to French President Emmanuel Macron on Aug. 16, another European heavyweight.

“All these indicate there is a growing reaction in Europe against Trump administration’s restrictive and punitive economic policies. We are of the opinion that this marks an important point,” Kalın said.

European countries have expressed concerns and reactions over Trump’s harsh measures on Turkey on the grounds that it could also hit the global economic structure, particularly Europe, which has extensive economic cooperation with Turkey.

Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu said, “In fact, all these incidents have opened the world’s eyes. They have seen once again how the current American administration can disrespectfully use its economic power against countries,” Çavuşoğlu said.

Turkey’s frustration is bigger than US’s

Turkey’s disappointment regarding the Trump administration’s stance is much deeper because it has not taken into account its ally’s national security concerns, the Turkish government has said in response to a statement from a White House official that United States President Donald Trump is frustrated Turkey has not released pastor Andrew Brunson. 

Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu

Turkey’s  Minister of Foreign Affairs responding to President Trump’s “frustration

“The president has a great deal of frustration on the fact that pastor Brunson has not been released as well as the fact that other U.S. citizens and employees of diplomatic facilities have not been released,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders in a statement on Aug. 14.

“The U.S. or any other country should not just focus on their own frustrations. They should also take into account our frustrations [with regard to their policies]. We also have frustrations,” Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu told reporters on Aug. 15 in response to a question on Sanders’ statement.

For Çavuşoğlu, the U.S. decision to ally with the People’s Protection Units (YPG) in Syria, a group Ankara considers as terrorist, and to arm them, is a bigger source of disappointment for Turkey.

The U.S. inaction on Turkey’s extradition request for Fethullah Gülen, the leader of the Fethullahist Terror Organization (FETÖ), who Ankara blames for the coup attempt in July 2016, is another source of frustration for Turkey, he said.

“Now, they are even trying to protect FETÖ members in third countries. Why do they support them? Because they love traitors or because they love Turks, Muslims? We only tell the truth and say what we see. You should not just see it from your perspective,” Çavuşoğlu said.

The minister called on the U.S. to respect the judicial processes and to put an end to the idea that their objectives could be achieved by pressure or punitive actions.

In the meantime, both Çavuşoğlu and Kalın explained the signing of the Pentagon bill delaying the transfer of F-35 aircraft to Turkey for 90 days should not be considered as a sanction.

“Turkey is not just purchasing F-35s but a part of this project. It made its payments for the project. Turkey will have to resort to legal action if these aircraft are not delivered. We hope this will not happen,” Kalın said.

“Our advice to the U.S. is not to use these as a tool. This seriously tarnishes U.S. credibility. No country in the world is without alternatives and helpless. Every nation is honorable and needs to be respected,” he said.

Don’t force Turkey to look for other friends, Erdoğan addresses US in NYT article

Erdogan-has-hit-out-against-Trump-1002153Failure to reverse the “trend of unilateralism and disrespect” will force Turkey to look for new friends and allies, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has warned the United States administration in an opinion piece for the New York Times, referring to the ongoing diplomatic crisis between two countries over the arrest of Pastor Andrew Brunson.

After reminding the long history of friendly bilateral relations, Erdoğan said in the Aug. 10 article: “Unless the United States starts respecting Turkey’s sovereignty and proves that it understands the dangers that our nation faces, our partnership could be in jeopardy.”

turkey-lira-crisis-Erdogan-vladimir-putin-donald-trump-1455691Turkish President likened the 2016 coup attempt in Turkey to Pearl Harbor attack, noting that the U.S. failed to “unequivocally condemn the attack and express solidarity with Turkey’s elected leadership” following the defeated putsch, while the leader of the coup plotters, Fethullah Gülen, still lives in Pennsylvania.

As another source of strained ties, Erdoğan also cited the U.S. support for the People’s Protection Units (YPG), which is considered by Ankara as the Syrian branch of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), a terrorist organization according to both countries.

gorusme-MHmR_coverThe Brunson issue was the last straw, according to Erdoğan. “Instead of respecting the judicial process, as I urged President Trump to do in our many meetings and conversations, the United States issued blatant threats against a friendly nation and proceeded to impose sanctions on several members of my cabinet. This decision was unacceptable, irrational and ultimately detrimental to our longstanding friendship,” he said.

Repeating that Turkey would not respond to threats and will take necessary steps to protect its national interests, Erdoğan warned that Ankara “will take care of its own business if the United States refuses to listen,” like it did in the 1970s when the Turkish government stepped in to prevent massacres of ethnic Turks by the Greek Cypriots despite Washington’s objections.

5b0513205d1c2e1c0c454ff2“At a time when evil continues to lurk around the world, unilateral actions against Turkey by the United States, our ally of decades, will only serve to undermine American interests and security. Before it is too late, Washington must give up the misguided notion that our relationship can be asymmetrical and come to terms with the fact that Turkey has alternatives,” Erdoğan concluded. “Failure to reverse this trend of unilateralism and disrespect will require us to start looking for new friends and allies.”

Turkish officials held meetings on Aug. 8 with the State Department’s No. 2 official, John Sullivan, following a move by the U.S. to hit two senior Turkish government ministers with sanctions over the detention of Brunson.

While the two sides stated that the talks will continue, U.S. President Donald Trump announced higher tariffs on imports from Turkey as the Turkish Lira continued to tumble on Aug. 10.

Source

Who wants to start World War III?

An opinion piece in our local English language newspaper this morning:

US sanctions on Turkey are wrong and can backfire

US Turkey

A smile on his face and knife in the other hand for back-stabbing

The U.S. Treasury’s move to put Turkish Justice Minister Abdulhamit Gül and Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu on its sanctions list on Aug. 1, saying that it was because of their role in the arrest of American evangelical pastor Andrew Brunson, caused outrage in Turkey. The Turkish Foreign Ministry strongly condemned it, asking for its cancellation while also vowing to take reciprocal action. Four parties in the Turkish Parliament released a joint declaration against the American move. The Turkish-American Business Council was the first institution to protest the move as “unacceptable” and called on the two sides’ presidents, Donald Trump and Tayyip Erdoğan, to give diplomacy a chance in order to put the two allies’ relations back on track. 

In a nutshell, the U.S. sanctions worked as a “rally round the flag effect” factor in Turkey. And not only in Turkey. The move instigated by Vice President Mike Pence is likely to endorse Erdoğan’s “hero against the imperialist hegemony” image among Muslims, not at a governmental level, but among the general public. This is the first time the U.S. is imposing sanctions, and in a very heavy way, on a NATO ally. The sanctions are issued under the Global Magnitsky Act of 2012, which had been issued for 18 Russian officials and businessmen before. On Aug. 2, the U.S. moved to sanction some more Russian figures under the same act.

Read the whole article

Turkey and Iran are next-door neighbours. Where are the “United” States? Check your map if you’re not sure . . .

Iranian FM slams US sanctions on Turkey

Iran FMIranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif has criticized the United States’ sanctions on Turkey on Twitter on Aug. 2. 

“US’ unlawful sanctions against two Turkish ministers – from an allied country – illustrates not just US administration’s policy of pressure and extortion in lieu of statecraft, but that its addiction to sanctions knows no bounds,” Zarif said.

Source

And a slightly different take from news.com Australia:

IF the world’s economy had a jugular vein, it would be the Strait of Hormuz. It’s a narrow channel linking the Persian Gulf to the Arabian Sea. And through it flows the lifeblood of the world — oil.

Iran US war

If they’re playing a game, it’s a very dangerous one!

And Iran has it within its grip.

President Trump ordered new sanctions against Iran on Monday. Iran’s leadership has replied by threatening to shut down the Strait if it is barred from exporting oil.

Yesterday, Iranian naval commander, Rear Admiral Hossein Khanzadi, said his military was ready to close the strait if ordered to do so. These exercises demonstrate it is willing and capable.

And Turkey’s government has said it will not support the USA’s sanctions against Iran. Meanwhile, President Erdoğan’s “hero against the imperialist hegemony” image is not only perceived by Muslims:

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro attended the extraordinary summit of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) in Istanbul in December last year

maduro in Istanbul

Venezuela’s President Maduro with Turkish presidential spokesman İbrahim Kalın

President Nicolas Maduro was among the attendees of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation’s (OIC) extraordinary summit held in Istanbul on Wednesday upon Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s call following U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision on Jerusalem.

Maduro, who is in Istanbul for another meeting, attended the summit as a special observer. Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza and Minister of Communication Jorge Rodriguez were also present at the extraordinary summit.

On Monday Maduro stated that Trump’s declaration was “illegal, absolutely illegal.” He went on to say that it was a provocation and a declaration of war against the Arabs, Muslims and the good people of the world.

Source

They_Were_All_Out_of_Step_But_Jim_sheet_music_cover_artMy Grandma Jessie used to have a story she’d quote to pointedly criticise someone whose selfish arrogance refused to acknowledge that there were others in the world who might have a valid point-of-view. The proud mother was watching from her window a regiment of soldiers marching up the street. “Did you notice?” she said. “They were all out of step but Jim.”