UK asks for Turkish support against Russia over murder attempt

WTF? British Government declares war on Russia – and Turkey rushes to support its old friend. Yeah, sure, Trees!

The United Kingdom has called for Turkey to show solidarity in its dispute with Russia over the attempted murder of a former Russian spy and his daughter on U.K. soil through the use of a nerve agent produced in Russia.

UK ambassador

And what did President Erdoğan have to say on the subject, I wonder?

“I just came back from a meeting at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs where I asked the Turkish government to show solidarity with the U.K. in this matter. I emphasized that the U.K. government would not be deterred from challenging Russia’s aggression and its disregard for international rules and behavior,” British Ambassador to Turkey Dominick Chilcott told reporters in Ankara on March 13.

Chilcott said U.K. ambassadors serving in NATO and prominent Western countries had been instructed to speak to host countries to inform them that London was taking seriously the issue of the poisoning of Sergei Skripal, 66. 

“Russian aggression is not only a threat to the U.K. but to all countries,” he added.

When asked about what particular demands the U.K. has from Turkey given the fact that Ankara is one few NATO countries with good ties with Russia, Chilcott said London does not want any direct Turkish intervention against Russia.

“When I talk about solidarity, I am talking about a sense of mutual understanding of the significance of the attempted murder in the U.K. If the Turkish government wishes to say anything in public or to support action condemning it in NATO or in any other international forum such as at the U.N., of course that would be very much welcome,” he said.

The U.K. is mulling initiatives in NATO, at the U.N. and at the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Chilcott stated, stressing that this was the first time a nerve agent has been used in an attempted murder in Europe since 1945. This attack on a former spy who has been living in the U.K. as a result of an agreement that involved the Russian government is just another example of recent Russian aggression, Chilcott stressed, citing the annexation of Crimea and widespread instability in the east of Ukraine.

“These were two people who were living a quiet life. We completely reject the idea that there is some sort of James Bond-like justification for what has happened,” he said.

Source: Hürriyet Daily news

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Turkey securing its border – USA supporting terrorists

jacinda's baby

Wanna see my baby bump?

I returned to Istanbul on Sunday after a 17-day trip to the idyllic South Sea Islands, where media attention was focused on the pregnancy of the recently elected Prime Minister, and whether she would have a boy, a girl, or some more politically correct, post-modern variation of one or the other. And what did I find back here? Turkey on the brink of war with the United States of America!

Of course, you will be aware that the Turkish military has begun conducting air and land strikes across its border into Syria, targeting Kurdish irregular forces holed up in the Afrin region. I don’t know what picture of this your local media have been presenting. What little coverage I saw downunder was portraying Turkey as the aggressor, ruthlessly bombing innocent Kurdish civilians in its ongoing suppression of those people’s righteous struggle for a national homeland.

Afrin map

Make sense of that, if you can – and put yourself in Turkey’s shoes for a moment

Well, I’m not going into a lengthy analysis of the Kurdish situation in the Middle East. Millions of Kurdish people live in Turkey, and I suspect the vast majority of them are mostly interested in working to make a better life for themselves and their children. Given the option, few of them would relocate to a mountainous landlocked state in the Middle East, however oil-rich it might be. Despite the nay-sayers, the lives of most Kurdish people have improved enormously under the present government of Turkey, in terms of recognising their ethnic identity, supporting Kurdish language TV channels and encouraging economic development in eastern Turkey.

Undoubtedly, not all Kurds are happy campers. Just as in New Zealand, where elements among the native Maori population will not be satisfied until white NZers have gone back to Scotland, or wherever our ancestors came from, there are militant nationalist Kurdish elements ready and willing to employ violent tactics to achieve – whatever it is they want to achieve.

Rose Gottermoeller, Deputy General Secretary of NATO, speaking in Ankara the other day, acknowledged that:

Turkey is among the NATO members “most affected by terror attacks” and NATO fully recognizes the threat posed to it . . .

“Turkey has really suffered from terrorism in recent years and has a very serious problem. It is among the NATO allies that suffer the most attacks in recent years and we do recognize that fully,” [she said].

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Syrian children attending school in Turkey

She could have gone on to add that, since civil war broke out in Syria in March 2011, the people of Turkey have been obliged to host and care for nearly four million refugees fleeing the violence – with precious little aid from their wealthy NATO allies.

Those refugees have been flooding across an 822 km land border between the two countries – a border than runs through some pretty mountainous and inhospitable geography, near impossible to police. Needless to say, among the hopeless, helpless and harmless multitudes, there are a few malcontents taking advantage of the situation to enter Turkey with a view to causing mayhem. There are also young men passing the other way, fired up by ideology or boredom, seeking to join one side or the other in the Syrian conflict – a relatively minor aspect that Western media have chosen to focus on.

Security forces in Turkey are quite proficient at maintaining order – given the geo-political turbulence in the region, they need to be. Their task is made more difficult, however, by support provided to local terrorists by interested groups across the border in Iraq and Syria.

Turkey has long complained about American support for Syrian Kurdish militias, which it says have emboldened the Kurdish separatist movement that Ankara considers a threat to its territorial sovereignty and is prepared to go to great lengths to counteract. Turkish officials say that this has allowed weapons and support to reach the outlawed the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or P.K.K., which is considered a terrorist organization by the United States and Europe and has waged a decades-long insurgency in Turkey.”

Those militias have been strengthened for many years by the United States government supplying arms, training and financial support. As far back as 1991, George Bush the Father was conducting Operation Provide Comfort, supporting Kurds in Northern Iraq. A few years later, George the Son was enlisting the aid of Iraqi Kurds in his crusading mission to rid the world of Saddam Hussein and his non-existent weapons of mass destruction. What did George Dubya and his cronies promise Masoud Barzani in return? An independent Kurdistan? And why would they do that? Anything to do with having a grateful, oil rich puppet state in the middle of the Middle East, I wonder? Draw your own conclusions.

They-lied-about-Iraq-Afghan-Libya-Syria-IranAnd more recently, Big Donald, the Holy Ghost, has been succouring Kurdish militants in north-west Syria. A senior American commander, according to the New York Times, “praised the partnership with the Kurds, whose help was critical in a major American airstrike on the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, over the weekend.”

“Senior Pentagon officials and American commanders,” the article continued, “say that the Syrian Kurds will most likely serve as the backbone of the allied forces on the ground in Syria for months to come.”

“Echoing earlier comments by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, the commander of the United States Central Command, General Joseph L. Votel, said in an interview last month that American forces would remain in eastern Syria, alongside their Syrian Kurdish and Arab allies, as long as needed to defeat the Islamic State.”

On the other hand, the same article referred to a White House message “aimed at mollifying Turkey’s president on Tuesday, suggesting that the United States was easing off its support for the Syrian Kurds.”

“. . . the White House disavowed a plan by the American military to create a Kurdish-led force in northeastern Syria, which Turkey has vehemently opposed. Turkey, which considers the Kurdish militia a terrorist organization, fears the plan would cement a Kurdish enclave along its southern frontier.

“That plan, a senior administration official said Tuesday, originated with midlevel military planners in the field, and was never seriously debated, or even formally introduced, at senior levels in the White House or the National Security Council.

“The official, who spoke to reporters on condition that he not be identified, also said that the United States had no connection to the Kurds in the northwestern Syrian city of Afrin, where the Turkish military has launched an invasion in recent days.

“And he drew a distinction between allies — a term he said had legal connotations — and partners in a combat mission, like the Kurds. America’s actions on the ground in Syria, he said, would be driven by a calculation of its interests.”

Meaning the United States’ interests, of course. And if US interests conflict with those of its loyal NATO allies, the allies can go hang. Nevertheless, countries like Turkey do have their own national interests, especially since they are somewhat closer to ground zero in Syria than most Americans. Our English language Turkish daily, Hurriyet Daily News has this to say about the US’s “combat partners”:

The YPG is the armed wing of the Democratic Union Party (PYD) and is the Syrian branch of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). The PKK has been fighting Turkey for decades and is designated a terrorist by numerous countries, including the U.S. Former Defense Secretary Ashton Carter even admitted during a congressional hearing in April 2016 that the YPG and the PKK were “organically linked.”

This is why U.S. Special Forces Commander General Raymond Thomas asked YPG personnel to rename themselves, in order to circumvent NATO ally Turkey in the anti-ISIL alliance. “With about a day’s notice they declared they were the Syrian Democratic Forces [SDF],” Thomas said at the July 2017 Aspen Security Forum in Colorado.

He continued mockingly, amid laughter from the audience. “I thought it was a stroke of brilliance to put ‘democracy’ in there somewhere,” he said. “But it gave them a little bit of credibility. I was lucky to have a great partner like Brett McGurk with me, because they were asking for things that I couldn’t give them. They wanted a seat at the table, whether it’s Geneva, or Astana, or wherever the talks are happening about the future of Syria. But because they have been branded as the PKK they could never get to the table. So we paired them militarily and McGurk was able to keep them in the conversation.”

What’s in a name? Rename a Kurdish terrorist as a loyal US partner fighting for democracy in Syria against an evil dictator, and all will be well.

Turkey’s President, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, however, as he often does, is calling out the United States government for its hypocrisy.

“The U.S. is urging that [Turkey’s Operation Olive Branch] should not last too long and should be conducted within a certain time frame. I ask the U.S.: Does your operation in Afghanistan, which you launched more than 10 years ago, have a certain time frame? When will it be completed? You are also still in Iraq, aren’t you? Do these kinds of operations have a certain time frame?” Erdoğan added.

So where does that leave us, we helpless observers of the great global imperialist game?

“Terrorists in Manbij are constantly firing provocation shots,” Turkey’s foreign minister, Mevlut Cavuşoğlu, said the other day. “If the United States doesn’t stop this, we will stop it.

A Turkish assault on Manbij could bring its forces into direct conflict with the Americans, with unpredictable results.

The NY Times correspondents wrote, “Robert S. Ford, a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and a former Ambassador to Syria, wrote in an analytical column that Turkey’s military operations in Syria demonstrated the difficulties of the American position. Turkey’s brushoff of American concerns made the United States look weak, Mr. Ford wrote, adding that some Kurdish observers were accusing America of being an unreliable ally.

“Over the longer term, it is hard to see how the U.S. will secure its stated political goal of stabilization in eastern Syria and genuine governance reforms in Syria,” he wrote.

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Babies in Syria

Murat Yetkin, writing in Hurriyet Daily News, observed, “It is not hard to see that such a relationship [between the US and Kurdish militant groups] must end at some point, because it is not right. The partnership even evokes memories of the U.S.’s arming of Islamist tribes in Afghanistan to fight the Soviet invasion.”

Well, of course I wish the people of New Zealand, their Prime Minister and her principal care-giving partner joy and happiness in their new First Baby. I’m pleased, however, to be back in a part of the world where issues of genuine global importance receive more attention.

Plots against Turkey

I don’t know what sort of coverage it got in your part of the world. I did find a piece or two in the UK’s Guardian, and on the BBC, linked to a lot of “related” pieces about Turkey’s “Islamic dictator” imprisoning poor innocents merely because they tried to have him ousted by a military coup last July. Both articles make judicious use of words like “allegedly” and “reportedly”, but there doesn’t seem to be much doubt about the facts.

erdoğan foeTurkey had sent 40 soldiers to participate in a NATO training exercise in Norway. Well, even military exercises need an enemy, and apparently the NATO organisers in their wisdom chose to use the name of Turkey’s much-maligned President Erdoğan, alongside a picture of the revered founder of Turkey’s republic.

Understandably, the Turkish government was not amused and withdrew its participants from the exercise. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg promptly issued an apology, followed by a statement by Norway’s minister of defence expressing his “concerns about the incident”. So, it seems pretty clear that the facts are essentially as reported.

Stoltenberg’s statement claimed the incident was the result of an “individual’s actions” – a Norwegian civil contractor seconded by Norway, and not a NATO employee – and did not reflect the views of the alliance.

Turkey, it seems, is not to be so easily appeased. The country’s EU Minister asked, with some justification, “Is there no chain of command? Does he [the civilian contracted person] not have a commander?” A government spokesman, addressing a press conference, said “We welcome the apologies issued. We welcome the removal of those responsible from office and the launching of an investigation. But we don’t see these incidents as solely extending to individuals. It’s not possible to explain these incidents merely in terms of individual responsibility,”

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Reza Zarrab in custody in the USA

Meanwhile, a curious court case is proceeding slowly in the United States. An Iranian-Turkish businessman, Reza Zarrab, was arrested in the US last year “on charges that he conspired to conduct hundreds of millions of dollars in financial transactions for the Iranian government and other entities to evade U.S. sanctions.”

Whatever we may think about the rest of the world being expected to support corporate America in its vendetta against uncooperative foreign leaders, it struck many people as strange that Mr Zarrab would voluntary enter the USA knowing that he would probably be arrested.

An opinion piece in Turkey’s English language Hürriyet Daily News voiced these concerns, suggesting CIA involvement:

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What’s changed since 1974?

“It was never convincing that Zarrab, known worldwide for breaching the U.S.’s Iran sanctions and getting arrested in Turkey in the Dec. 17- 25, 2013 corruption and bribery operations, came to the U.S. to take his child on a trip. 

His arrival in the U.S. was thought to be the result of a negotiation. It is claimed that he negotiated to become a confessor in return for a permission that will allow him to keep his assets outside Turkey and continue commercial activity.

If he becomes a confessor, the story will widen more and a new indictment will be written.

‘It smells fishy,’ President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan had said about it.

The writer, Abdulkadir Selvi, goes on to say, “The U.S, after failing to overthrow Erdoğan through FETÖ on Dec. 17 – 25, 2013, stepped into the issue with the Zarrab case.”

Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister, Bekir Bozdağ said the other day, “We make no secret of it: This is a political case and does not have a legal basis. It is a plot against Turkey. The prosecutors have been openly imposing pressure on the accused. . . [Zarrab] is in a sense taken hostage,” Bozdağ said, claiming that Zarrab is “under pressure from prosecutors to become a confessor and to make accusations against the Republic of Turkey.”

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Bringing democracy to the developing world

Another writer in Hürriyet, Barçın Yinanç, no slavish supporter of the government, made some apt observations about negative portrayals of Turkey and its government in foreign media. In a piece entitled “Who is losing Turkey? She wrote:

“Turkey lives in a troubled neighborhood and the Western world has often had problematic relations with its neighbors.

There has been a bad guy in Damascus, Bashar al-Assad. No one was supposed to cooperate with him and Turkey was once asked to follow suit.

There was also a bad guy in Iraq, Saddam Hussein. Sanctions were applied against his regime and Turkey was asked to abide by those sanctions.

In Iran, there has been a bad regime ever since the Islamic Revolution. Tehran has been continuously under sanctions, which Turkey has been under pressure to abide by.

There has also been a bad guy in Russia, the Kremlin. Sanctions have been introduced and Turkey has been required to follow them.

People sometimes forget that economically thriving nations trade with their neighbors. Some also forget that while the EU wanted Turkey to abide by the sanctions it imposed on countries to its east, north and south, it did not exactly have its arms wide open when Turkey turned to Europe.

Currently, when a foreign observer looks at Turkey, they see an Islamist leader distancing Turkey away from the transatlantic alliance. But the same observer may forget that it was that same leader who once undertook the most sweeping democratic reforms Turkey has ever seen. They may also forget that when Ankara knocked on the EU’s door in the 2000s, Germany’s Angela Merkel and then French President Nicolas Sarkozy effectively closed the door in its face. It also suited Europe’s interest to keep Turkey at arm’s length, hiding behind the Greek Cypriot administration which has been blocking accession talks.

This has all been forgotten. No one in Europe is questioning who caused the EU to lose Turkey. Why should they?”

germany-lead

New election coming up in Germany? Wasn’t the September result satisfactory? German voters should think again!

But not in our backyard – More US hypocrisy!

The United States government is supplying weapons to separatist Kurdish militants in Syria, in direct opposition to the clearly expressed wishes of long-term loyal NATO ally Turkey. Their generosity and support, however, stops short of allowing the PYD leader anywhere near Homeland USA.

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If he’s your friend why not invite him to your house?

The leader of the Syrian Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD), whose military wing is planning an operation to capture Raqqa from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) with the support of the U.S.-led anti-ISIL coalition, has been denied a visa to the United States, following a similar decision in 2015.

The visa application by Salih Muslim was rejected two months ago, forcing him to attend a conference organized on May 25 in Washington via teleconference.

The rejection came despite Washington’s continuous support for the PYD’s military wing, the People’s Protection Units (YPG). 

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Whose flag? Whose troops?

Despite the objections of Ankara, which considers the PYD and YPG as organic extensions of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) and hence terrorists groups, U.S. President Donald Trump earlier this month authorized the Pentagon to provide the YPG with heavy weapons and armored vehicles.

Speaking via teleconference at May 25’s conference, Muslim said the decision to give weapons to the YPG was a “very important step,” noting his expectation that the relationship with the U.S. would “widen into the political field, as well as the diplomatic field.”

When Muslim was asked by an audience member why he was not in the U.S., he said he was told two months ago that his visa application had been rejected.

Muslim’s visa application on 2015 was also rejected during the Barack Obama administration.

Read the whole article

Looking out for your Friends – Europe and American style

I could hardly believe it was true when I heard the news – but on reflection I realised the behaviour is totally in character.

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America’s true friends in the Middle East

The United States military Central Command (CENTCOM) announced on Sunday that it was “conducting patrols” along the Syrian side of the Turkey-Syria border. The stated purpose is “’to discourage escalation and violence between two of our most trusted partners in the fight to defeat ISIL’, the statement said . . . all parties in the region should remain focused on defeating the terror group.”

Photographs of the “patrols” published in Turkish media showed tanks flying US flags alongside ground forces belonging to the Kurdish separatist group YPG. The US source refers to “coalition forces”, implying some kind of Western alliance along the lines of George Dubya’s “Coalition of the Willing”, but in this case it’s just Americans and locals – a hotchpotch of anti-Assad rebels referred to by various unintelligible acronyms such as SDF and YPG.

In fact the US’s main “trusted partner” in the “fight” against ISIS/ISIL/Daesh is YPG – a shadowy Kurdish separatist group that Ankara claims is allied with the PKK, a revolutionary Kurdish outfit that regularly carries out terrorist attacks in Turkey, and is recognised internationally as a terrorist organisation. Turkey’s government has for years been asking Washington to establish a no-fly zone along the Syria-Turkey border to assist in the maintenance of security – but the requests have gone unheeded. Recently Turkey has begun taking matters into its own hands by carrying out airstrikes in retaliation for alleged aggression by the Kurdish groups.

Evidently the US military sees this as running contrary to their own plans for the region. “Patrols” of tanks along the border are clearly intended as a warning to Turkey’s government to toe the party line, ie the United States’ line – despite the fact no one is very clear exactly what that is.

Initially the Turkish government was reluctant to get involved in the “fight against ISIS/ISIL/Daesh” – understandably, given that many people believe that mysterious organisation was created, directly or indirectly, by the ham-fisted US invasion and occupation of Iraq. Turkey accepted the Assad dictatorship in Syria as a necessary evil until the Arab Spring in 2011 gave birth to a resistance movement and a long-running civil war that drove millions of refugees across its border.

Just the other day, Turkey’s President Erdoğan made it clear that his country now fully supports America’s fight against ISIS. He said that together, Turkey, the United States and its coalition partners could destroy ISIL/ISIS/Daesh – but said also that his government is not happy with America allying itself with terrorist groups (meaning the PKK-allied YPG). Turkey’s concern is that the US is promising Kurdish separatists an independent Kurdistan in return for their help, first in defeating Saddam Hussein, and now against ISIS/ISIL/Daesh. Given that such a new state would likely lay claim to a large chunk of south east Turkey, we can understand Mr Erdoğan’s unease. And given that the US has repeatedly turned a deaf ear to Turkey’s concerns in the matter, we may also understand why he feels his country has no option but to take action in its own interests.

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Protecting the Money Power

Unfortunately this situation mirrors many that have taken place in this region and others as the United States and the EU play out their self-appointed role as the world’s policemen. Peace in the Middle East is unlikely as long as the US refuses to acknowledge valid Palestinian grievances against Israel. One of the biggest stumbling blocks to Turkey’s acceptance into the EU is the intransigence of Greece and Greek Cyprus, and the refusal to recognise that Turkey had a good reason for its military intervention on the island in 1974. I’m not even going to start talking about the number of times the US has interfered directly in the affairs of its neighbours in Central and South America.

Johannes Hahn, European Commissioner overseeing EU membership bids, suggested on Monday that in the current circumstances, Turkey’s bid to join the EU was dead in the water. Mr Hahn and his friends in Brussels are blaming Turkey for this, despite the fact that they have been holding their loyal NATO ally at arm’s length for 30 years, while admitting more and more former members of the old Soviet bloc, thereby heightening tensions with Russia. Hahn’s current excuse for rejecting Turkey is the old chestnut of human rights. When Turkey was having regular military coups back in the late 20th century, and torture and disappearances of political dissidents were commonplace, that was the big issue. As the country began to leave those days behind, the Cyprus business began to loom as the major obstacle. Now, as Turkey tries to stabilise itself in the wake of an unsuccessful military takeover, civil war and chaos across its eastern borders, a flood of refugees and tourist embargoes stretching its economic resources to the limit, and threats of terrorist attacks in its cities, the human rights business has surfaced again. “There is no version of Turkish democracy,” says Mr Hahn. “There is only democracy.” By which he means, I guess, “Do as we say or suffer the consequences.”

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Turkey is undemocratic – we’re just protecting our democracy

Thanks for your sympathy, guys. Never mind that France is still living under a state of emergency 18 months after a terrorist attack that killed a tiny fraction of the number of people who have died in Turkey. The fact is that, whatever their posturing, Europe needs Turkey more than Turkey needs Europe. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg announced recently that “the alliance without Turkey would be weak”.  Turkey is getting on with the job of caring for three million Syrian refugees while wealthy European countries are bleating about having to cope with mere hundreds or thousands. EU leaders promised major financial and diplomatic assistance to Turkey in return for Turkey preventing those refugees from continuing their flight into Europe. Precious little assistance has been forthcoming although Turkey has upheld its side of the bargain. “Think,” said Stoltenberg, “if any other NATO country besides Turkey was under the massive terrorist attacks Turkey has faced. Turkey has the right to defend its country and to punish the people who launched the thwarted coup attempt of July 2016.”

freespeech-wuerker-468-x-413My opinion is, leaders of the European Union and the United States want to see the back of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. They resent the fact that, since his AK Party came to power in 2003, they have been obliged to start taking Turkey seriously. They can no longer mock the country for its hyperinflation and regular military coups. They are angry that Turkey is no longer a lapdog following the Western alliance wherever its economic interests lead. Turkey refused to follow George Dubya into Iraq, has openly criticised Israel’s illegal settling of Palestinian territory, and called out the Sisi military coup in Egypt for what it was. They are furious that every criticism they make of Turkey is thrown back in their faces with interest. Armenian genocide? Check out what the French did in Algeria. “We love Turkish people,” they’ll tell you. “It’s just that guy we can’t stand!” Yeah, yeah.

No2EU-do-as-you-are-toldSo there is only “democracy” . . . Western style. But what about countries that look at the West and say, “We don’t want that kind of democracy”? In fact, as we see from recent election results in the USA and France, there are actually plenty of people in those countries who are not sure they want it either. Mr Erdoğan’s government gets a good deal of flak for criticising and even censoring social media. So what do you make of the Home Affairs Select Committee report to the UK Parliament criticising large social media companies? The report accuses them of failing to remove illegal content such as hate speech, terror recruitment videos and sexual images of children when asked to do so. It said the largest firms were “big enough, rich enough and clever enough” to sort the problem out, and that it was “shameful” that they had failed to use the same ingenuity to protect public safety as they had to protect their own income.

A year or so ago, Mr Erdoğan came under considerable fire for his over-sensitivity in response to a poem aired on German television. A “comedian” from that highly civilised country trumpeted several verses of foul-mouthed X-rated doggerel accusing the Turkish president of committing unspeakable acts with sheep and goats. I say “unspeakable”, not because I am unduly sensitive, but because you won’t find any mainstream news media that were prepared to publish an English translation.

The German Public Prosecutor, in throwing out a case against the “comedian/poet”, is quoted as saying, “the context in which it was delivered made clear the claims were “exaggerated and absurd”, and not meant to be taken as serious allegations against Mr Erdogan [and] it was therefore “questionable” whether the poem constituted slander, given its satirical nature, and that the “from the lack of earnestness or any seriously intended connection to the personal dignity of (Mr Erdogan), it was meant to be immediately clear to every listener that it was a joke”.

So what about the shrill cries of protest in the USA over a “comedian” in that country suggesting that Donald Trump engages in fellatio with Russian President Putin? Seems it’s ok to accuse the leader of a key NATO ally of sexual shenanigans with sheep and goats – but if you step on the hypersensitive toes of the ever-lengthening LGBTIQ acronymiacs . . . that may be one step too far into the shaky ground of free speech.

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I’m not a big fan of the dear departed Winston, but . . .

I have to tell you, I’m in two minds about the “free speech” business. It may be that it is acceptable in Germany and the United States to accuse, in the most obscene and biologically precise terms, high-profile public figures of inserting their reproductive organs into the corresponding receptacles of female goats, of taking ovine male organs, or those of other countries’ leaders, into their mouths, and who knows what else. I have to tell the democratically self-righteous citizens of those countries, however, that they may not experience the same freedom everywhere. In Turkey, for example, you need to be careful about dropping a loose word with reference to another man’s mother or sister, if you value your health.

And the other thing that seems to me somewhat ironic – These freedom-of-speechers demand the right to make the most outrageously untrue accusations while expecting that the law of the land will protect them from the righteous anger of those whose honour and integrity they are intent on vilifying. That strikes me as cowardice in the extreme. Say and do what you like – but why should I pay taxes to protect you from the consequences of your “freedom”?

For many years I have been hearing these champions of free speech hiding behind words attributed to the 18th century French philosopher Voltaire: “I don’t agree with what you say but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” Interestingly, I now find that the “quotation” was actually invented by Evelyn Beatrice Hall, author of a biography of Voltaire published in 1906, where she asserted that he had uttered the words – a claim she later retracted.

Soooo, it seems no one has a monopoly on the truth – and those who claim it most vociferously may be the ones we most need to distrust.

Solving the world’s problems – Different strokes for different folks

Tomahawk-míssil-disparado+de+destróier

Another creative response from the United States.

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Meanwhile, Turkey gets on with the job of dealing with 3 million refugees,

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and the European Union lends a helping hand.

According to the US Department of Defence’s annual budget, a single Tomahawk missile costs $1.59 million.

Combine that by the 59 missiles the US ordered to be fired off two warships in the Mediterranean Sea, and you’re looking at a bill of around $94 million. (Source)

And that’s not counting the cost of keeping a fleet of warships in the Mediterranean Sea. Why don’t they do something about poverty, health, education and equal opportunities in their own country?

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While the Tomahawk isn’t as devastating as some of the missiles carried on board manned aircraft, it is typically used when Western nations [especially the USA] want a long-range weapon that can be fired from safe territory.

But it seems the US Government is actually proud of what they’ve done:

“The United States blasted a Syrian air base with a barrage of cruise missiles Friday afternoon in fiery retaliation for this week’s gruesome chemical weapons attack against civilians.

President Donald Trump cast the US assault as vital to deter future use of poison gas and called on other nations to join in seeking “to end the slaughter and bloodshed in Syria.”

A Homs governor has told the Associated Press that the missile attack at the Syrian base has resulted in deaths. Reuters reports six Syrian soldiers were killed and seven wounded at the air base.

Russia responded, saying the US strike on Syria is “aggression against a sovereign state” and violates international law,” reported AP.

Probably the only thing that will stop Russia from supporting Syria militarily is the likelihood that the US government will nuke them if they do.

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PS – 100 tonnes of bombs and they only killed 6 people. Now there’s a precision strike for you!

The U.S. and NATO Need Turkey

The following opinion piece appeared in Time online today:

‘To cast Turkey loose now would forfeit our influence in the region and end a decades-long alliance’

Halil I. Danismaz

The bloody coup attempt that left more than 200 people dead and nearly upended Turkey’s democratic institutions has shaken the country to its core.

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Standing tall for democracy in Turkey

I saw that dark moment—arguably the darkest in the country’s sad history of military dictatorships—unfold first-hand. I was on a plane to Istanbul when the coup plotters shut down the airport, then landed in the middle of the attack and stayed there for several weeks to witness the chaotic aftermath. There was a feeling of a nation under siege, being attacked from all sides.

Turkey has been battered by terrorism. Its most urgent need now is to defend itself and its democracy.

But the West’s response threatens to complicate how the U.S. and its NATO allies work with a country on the front lines of the global fight against ISIS. To cast Turkey loose now would forfeit our influence in the region and end a decades-long alliance. It could also drive Turkey into the arms of Russia—the wolf scratching at its door, which would like nothing more than to distance Turkey from the West.

This week’s visit by Vice President Joe Biden, the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit since the violent coup attempt last month, is a chance to repair the fractured relationship.

The U.S. has much at stake: Our allies and interests in Europe are under assault as never before. Syria and Iraq have ceased to exist as functioning states. ISIS is on the march from Libya to Afghanistan. And Iranian and Russian influence is steadily expanding.

Turkey stands as a bulwark against these rising threats. Located just 60 miles from the Syrian border, the Incirlirlik air base in southern Turkey—the crucial staging ground for American-led strikes against ISIS—allows our best A-10s, F-15s and drones to take the fight to ISIS in Syria and Iraq that were previously out of our reach.

It is also the anchor of NATO’s southeastern flank and home to its second-largest army. Western officials should heed NATO’s own words: “Turkey takes full part in the Alliance’s consensus-based decisions as we confront the biggest security challenges in a generation. Turkey’s NATO membership is not in question…NATO counts on the continued contributions of Turkey and Turkey can count on the solidarity and support of NATO.”

U.S. President Obama shakes hands with Turkey's PM Erdogan in Seoul

Love them or hate them, you have to accept the people’s choice – and that cuts both ways.

The change must begin by taming the rhetoric on both sides. The chaos I saw in Ankara has fomented a rising tide of anti-Americanism egged on by some Turkish officials and party-controlled press. Asserting that the U.S. played a role in the coup must stop immediately.

At the same time, U.S. officials and commentators should acknowledge that Turkey’s most urgent need now is to defend the very fabric of its civil society. Like him or not, President Erdogan is the legitimately and democratically-elected choice of the Turkish people, a claim bolstered by the recent support he has seen from the main secular opposition parties. He has earned the right to speak on their behalf and that right should be respected.

A formal mechanism will help us reach a mutually acceptable solution to the Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO) problem. FETO is a danger to the stability in the region that the U.S. and NATO seek. A similar threat to democracy that created the kind of carnage would produce an outcry of outrage if it happened any other NATO member state. There have been united calls for the extradition of FETO’s leader, Fethullah Gulen, who is currently residing in the U.S. This is a reasonable request based on the widespread belief in Turkey—both the people and the main opposition parties—that FETO played a central role in the execution of the failed coup.

America’s most powerful and consequential regional ally is threatened as never before, with potentially dire consequences for our shared interests. U.S. policymakers must recommit to the bilateral relationship, not cut and run. Read the whole article