3.6 million Syrian refugees have now fled to Turkey

20 percent of Syrian refugees live in Istanbul

Do the maths: 20% means 720,000 men women and children – More than the population of Seattle, WA, and slightly fewer than Charlotte, NC, the 17th and 18th largest cities in the United States! And you guys are still bombing them!

The Turkish province accommodating the highest number of Syrian refugees in the country is Istanbul with 20 percent, according to media monitoring company Ajans Press.

samserif_ak_final3

Istanbul’s “Little Syria”. “Şam” is “Damascus” in Turkish.

In figures that are based on data from the Interior Ministry’s Immigration Office, as well as media reports, as of June some 3.6 million Syrian refugees are hosted in Turkey.

Istanbul accommodates the highest number, followed by the southeastern province of Şanlıurfa and the southern province of Hatay.

Other provinces hosting a high number of Syrian refugees are the western provinces of Bursa and İzmir, the southeastern provinces of Gaziantep and Kilis, the Central Anatolian province of Konya, and the southern provinces of Adana and Mersin. The number of Syrians exceeds 100,000 in all of these provinces.

The registered number of Turks in Kilis, on the Turkey-Syria border north of Aleppo, stood at 136,319 as of last year, while the province hosts a total of 131,109 Syrian refugees. The demographic shift has sometimes led to confrontations between Turks and Syrians in the province.

276,158 Syrian babies born in last six years

The media monitoring company’s report also included the number of Syrian babies born in Turkey over the last six years, calculating it as reaching 276,158 based on figures from media outlets.

It also found that the issue of Syrian refugees was one of the most-discussed issues in Turkish media reports over the last six years.

The number of refugees has been on rise in Turkey since the outbreak of the Syrian civil war in 2011. The Syrian refugee population was 2.8 million in 2016 and 3.4 million in 2017.

Of the 3.6 million Syrian refugees, some 1.9 million are males and 1.7 million are females.

Source: Hürriyet Daily News

 

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Turkey completes 475-mile /764-km security wall on Syria border

Why?
Because they’ve already got 3.6 million refugees, and wealthy Western countries, who cause most of the trouble in the Middle East, offer no more than platitudes and token assistance.
And because the West has been constantly harping on about Turkey’s “porous” border.
How much did it cost? Who knows. A hell of a lot, I’m sure.
Where did the money come from? Ask yourself!

Border wall____________________________

Turkey has completed the construction of a 475-mile (764-kilometre) concrete wall along its border with Syria, according to a Turkish official on Saturday.
TOKI, the state backed housing developer, built 350 miles of the wall, while the governorates of the border provinces built 125 miles, the official told Anadolu Agency on condition of anonymity.
Ankara had launched the construction project in 2015 to build an 513 mile-long wall on the Syrian border, as part of Turkey’s measures to increase border security and combat smuggling and illegal border crossings.
Turkey shares a 566 mile border with Syria, which has been embroiled in a civil war since 2011.
The wall was sealed along Turkey’s border provinces of Sanliurfa, Gaziantep, Kilis, Hatay, Mardin and Sirnak.

The Wall
The border wall project incorporates physical, electronic and advanced technology layers.
The physical layer includes modular concrete walls, patrol routes, manned and unmanned towers and passenger tracks.
Modular walls are being erected along the Turkish-Syrian borderline with seven-ton mobile blocks, two meters wide and three meters high. The blocks have also been topped with a one-meter-high razor wire.
An electronic layer consists of close-up surveillance systems, thermal cameras, land surveillance radar, remote-controlled weapons systems, command-and-control centers, line-length imaging systems and seismic and acoustic sensors.
The advanced technology layer of the project includes wide area surveillance, laser destructive fibre-optic detection, surveillance radar for drone detection, jammers and sensor-triggered short distance lighting systems.

Source: Middle East Monitor

Turkish diaspora see Erdoğan as ‘healer’ of frustrations

Extracts from an interview with Professor Ayhan Kaya

From the start I have challenged the rise of “civilizational” discourse, which originates from the “clash of civilizations” paradigm introduced by Samuel Huntington, based on the idea that Muslims and Christians cannot live together simply because they are from two different civilizations. Civilization cannot simply be reduced to religions, it is much more of a material process related to urbanization, industrialization, etc.

1*0Fe6fTDdKidxPXKCNrljtgLook at what happened in Palestine. Israel killed more than 60 Palestinians and this shows there is no global justice. One of the reasons why there is more radicalization among Muslim-origin youths towards Islamism is the belief that there is no global justice.

Right-wing populist parties are instrumentalizing the fear of refugees and fear of Islam for their own use. In our interviews in six countries with supporters of right-wing populist parties, we saw that they are not actually too hostile to refugees. Rather, they are hostile to settled migrants.

In our research in different European countries we saw what Erdoğan signifies for many members of the Turkish-origin public. He is seen as the person who can heal the sources of their problems. What many see in the image of Erdoğan is a strong personality who can challenge European leaders.

We don’t really see much radicalization among Turkish-origin youths in terms of jihadism. We see that more among members of the North African diaspora. I think one of the reasons for this is the Ottoman past. The Ottomans were never colonized, which gives them a difference in terms of their identification compared to North Africans. 

The misperception about Islamophobes in Europe is contributing to the rise of anti-Westernism among Turkish politicians, some of whom have started to suggest there is a “war between the crescent and the cross.” This is completely wrong; the war is between the rich and the poor, the center and the periphery.

Read the whole article

Erdoğan long-awaited mentor for Muslims

Bosnian leader Bakir Izetbegovic said May 12 that Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is a mentor for Muslims, a fact that makes him unpopular in the West.

Bosnian leader

Bosnian leader Bakir Izetbegovic

Speaking at an event organized by his Party of Democratic Action (SDA) in capital Sarajevo, the chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina said: “Our friend is not very popular in the West, because Erdoğan is a long-awaited great leader for Muslims.”

“They [the West] are not disturbed by primitive and ignorant Muslims,” he said.

 “But when it comes to economic development, they are disturbed by a man who opens his doors to three million refugees, who builds the world’s largest airport, deals with terrorism and wars at his country’s borders.” 

Erdoğan is expected to visit Sarajevo on May 20. 

Izetbegovic said that their meeting during the visit will focus on a highway project that will link Sarajevo and Serbia’s capital Belgrade. 

Source: Hürriyet Daily News

Turkey establishes huge tent city in Syria’s Afrin

Turkey has established a tent city in Syria’s Afrin district for Syrians who fled from the Eastern Qalamoun region near the capital Damascus, Turkish General Staff announced on April 25.

Tent cityThe tent city was set up by the Turkish Prime Ministry’s Disaster and Emergency Management Authority (AFAD), according to photos and posts shared on the social media accounts of the Turkish General Staff.

“AFAD has established it and Mehmetçik [Turkish soldiers] have been protecting it. The families from Eastern Qalamoun are being provided shelter in the tent city established in Mahmoudiya, Afrin,” a post read.

The Turkish military has been protecting the area surrounding the tent city, photos showed.

The Turkish military and the allied Free Syrian Army (FSA) took the northwestern district of Afrin under full control on March 18 after an offensive against the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG).

Rebels fighting against the Syrian regime in the enclave of East Qalamoun recently agreed to lay down arms and to be transferred by buses to territories controlled by opposition forces.

Hürriyet Daily News

Syrian refugees in Germany returning to Turkey

A growing number of Syrian refugees in Germany are seeking to return to Turkey as a new German legislation has introduced new barriers to family reunification, local media reported on April 12.

Syrians in germany

The milk of German kindness

The German government recently imposed stricter measures to curb family reunification for Syrian refugees, many of whom were granted “subsidiary protection.”

German broadcaster ARD reported that its correspondents documented the journey of several Syrian refugees who sought to return to Turkey by paying hundreds of euros to human smugglers.

The refugees wanted to return to Turkey because they could not receive permission from German authorities to bring their family members who had fled to Turkey after the Syrian civil war broke out, the report said.

The EU’s largest economy has accepted more than 700,000 Syrian refugees since 2015, but amid domestic political pressure, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s coalition government introduced barriers to family reunification. A cap of 1,000 people per month was imposed on who could come to Germany for family reunification.

Family reunification was a hot issue in last year’s elections after media reported that around 390,000 refugees could apply for this right and bring their spouses and minor children to Germany.

The far-right Islamophobic Alternative for Germany (AfD) alleged that family reunification was an “incalculable risk” for the country and called for severe restrictions.

Source: Hurriyet Daily News

Meanwhile, several hundred thousand Syrian refugees have been able to return to their homes since the Turkish military started operations in Afrin, the Syrian region bordering Turkey. There are, however, still around three million displaced Syrians in Turkey.

Can Turkey do anything good?

I’m translating for your information an article I came across in our Turkish daily this morning

No one knows we are looking after 3.5 million refugees

On Wednesday, Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister, Mehmet Şimşek, participated in a panel discussion at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The session, chaired by well-known New York Times writer, Thomas Friedman, was titled “Finding a new equilibrium in the Middle East”

davos refugees

Wilful ignorance? Or just plain ordinary ignorance?

[Others on the panel were Anwar Gargash, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs of the United Arab Emirates, Adel bin Ahmed Al Jubeir, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia, Sheikh Khalid Bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Bahrain, and Ursula von der Leyen, Federal Minister of Defence of Germany; Member of Board of Trustees of the World Economic Forum.]

When Mr Şimşek mentioned that Turkey was currently hosting 3.5 million refugees from Syria, and if you included those from Iraq, the total reached 3.7 million, Friedman expressed surprise.

“Did you say 3.5 million?” he asked Şimşek.

Isn’t it rather strange that Friedman, who knows the Middle East very well, and has been writing about the region for years, wouldn’t know this figure?

Clearly, we have been unable to sufficiently publicise how many refugees we have in our country, and what we are doing for them.

Certainly, there is no excuse for Friedman’s not knowing the actual extent of the refugee crisis caused by the ongoing war in Syria. Spokespersons for the United Nations Refugee Agency have been speaking out on the issue for years and calling on First World nations to provide more assistance.

On the other hand, “experts” in the west seem to know some things about Turkey with absolute certainty:

  • They “know”, for example, that Turkey is responsible for the genocide of one-and-a-half million Armenians in 1915.
  • They “know” that Turkey invaded the island of Cyprus in 1974, divided it in two, and refuses to leave.
  • They “know “that Turkey has been buying oil from ISIS terrorists and supplying them with weapons.
  • They “know” that Turkey has more journalists in prison than any other country in the world.

Pretty much anything bad about Turkey, Western media are happy to circulate uncritically – but when it comes to giving credit for positive actions and achievements . . . ZILCH!

So, is Turkey at fault for not getting its message across? Or is it that Western interests don’t want to know? Draw your own conclusions.