Turkish diaspora see Erdoğan as ‘healer’ of frustrations

Extracts from an interview with Professor Ayhan Kaya

From the start I have challenged the rise of “civilizational” discourse, which originates from the “clash of civilizations” paradigm introduced by Samuel Huntington, based on the idea that Muslims and Christians cannot live together simply because they are from two different civilizations. Civilization cannot simply be reduced to religions, it is much more of a material process related to urbanization, industrialization, etc.

1*0Fe6fTDdKidxPXKCNrljtgLook at what happened in Palestine. Israel killed more than 60 Palestinians and this shows there is no global justice. One of the reasons why there is more radicalization among Muslim-origin youths towards Islamism is the belief that there is no global justice.

Right-wing populist parties are instrumentalizing the fear of refugees and fear of Islam for their own use. In our interviews in six countries with supporters of right-wing populist parties, we saw that they are not actually too hostile to refugees. Rather, they are hostile to settled migrants.

In our research in different European countries we saw what Erdoğan signifies for many members of the Turkish-origin public. He is seen as the person who can heal the sources of their problems. What many see in the image of Erdoğan is a strong personality who can challenge European leaders.

We don’t really see much radicalization among Turkish-origin youths in terms of jihadism. We see that more among members of the North African diaspora. I think one of the reasons for this is the Ottoman past. The Ottomans were never colonized, which gives them a difference in terms of their identification compared to North Africans. 

The misperception about Islamophobes in Europe is contributing to the rise of anti-Westernism among Turkish politicians, some of whom have started to suggest there is a “war between the crescent and the cross.” This is completely wrong; the war is between the rich and the poor, the center and the periphery.

Read the whole article

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Erdoğan long-awaited mentor for Muslims

Bosnian leader Bakir Izetbegovic said May 12 that Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is a mentor for Muslims, a fact that makes him unpopular in the West.

Bosnian leader

Bosnian leader Bakir Izetbegovic

Speaking at an event organized by his Party of Democratic Action (SDA) in capital Sarajevo, the chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina said: “Our friend is not very popular in the West, because Erdoğan is a long-awaited great leader for Muslims.”

“They [the West] are not disturbed by primitive and ignorant Muslims,” he said.

 “But when it comes to economic development, they are disturbed by a man who opens his doors to three million refugees, who builds the world’s largest airport, deals with terrorism and wars at his country’s borders.” 

Erdoğan is expected to visit Sarajevo on May 20. 

Izetbegovic said that their meeting during the visit will focus on a highway project that will link Sarajevo and Serbia’s capital Belgrade. 

Source: Hürriyet Daily News

Triplets in Turkey named after President Erdoğan – Today’s happy news!

Came across this article in today’s newspaper. I’m giving a translation for readers who don’t know Turkish. The original is a bit repetitious, so I’m abbreviating it a little:

Triplets

Little Recep, Tayyip and Erdoğan with mum, dad, big sister and the president

“President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan met with three-year-old triplets named Recep, Tayyip and Erdoğan at the office of the governor in Sivas [a historic city in the east of Turkey].

“President Erdoğan had met them for the first time during a visit to Sivas in 2015. After the meeting, the father and mother of the triplets, Dilek and Kemal Akıncı said they were very happy. ‘We met Mr Erdoğan for the first time in 2015 and afterwards we spoke on the telephone. We’re grateful that he visited us in Sivas. We met up at the governor’s office. We’re so happy,’ they said.”

Cumhurbaşkanı Erdoğan Minik Adaşları İle Görüştü

Cumhurbaşkanı Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, 3 yaşındaki Recep, Tayyip, Erdoğan isimlerini taşıyan üçüzler ile Sivas Valiliğinde bir araya geldi.

Cumhurbaşkanı Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, ilk kez 2015 yılında ki Sivas ziyareti sırasında tanıştığı; 3 yaşındaki Recep, Tayyip, Erdoğan isimlerini taşıyan üçüzlerle bugünkü Sivas ziyaretinde yeniden bir araya geldi. Sivas Valiliğindeki ziyaret sonrası üçüzlerin annesi Dilek Akıncı ve babaları Kemal Akıncı çok mutlu olduklarını belirterek, “İlk kez 2015 yılında görüşmüştük. Daha sonra telefonla görüştük. Sivas’ı ziyaret ettiği için kendisine çok teşekkür ediyoruz. Valilikte kendisi ile görüştük. Çok mutluyuz” dedi.

More evidence that the US was behind the failed coup attempt in Turkey

Reassessing The Reasons For The Failed Turkish Coup AttemptEVIL_EMPIRE_COVER_2_670

This review aims to re-evaluate the motivations for the regime change attempt and argues that the US exploited sharp pre-existing differences within Turkey’s military, elite, and society in order to instigate the coup for envisioned zero-sum geostrategic ends against Russia.

Notes from an unconscious a-s licker

speak the truthI don’t usually come out with a negative response to another blogger’s blog. We’re all in this for the fun, or the hobby, or the deep political convictions, or whatever, so I generally “LIKE” or, if possible, give some kind of positive, supportive comment to my co-word-pressers.

Somehow, though, I seem to have touched a raw nerve with one actual follower, to the extent that he took me to task on his blog – and when I responded, I thought, fairly moderately, I got this reply:

“If fear, given the current climate of repression in Turkey, is your reason for hiding behind a façade of obsequious fealty to the current President of Turkey and all that he and the AKP and the Muslim Brothers stand for, that may be excusable and perhaps even to be commended under the circumstances. After all, you live in Turkey and must go on making a living if you aren’t already retired, and if retired, don’t want to expose yourself to unnecessary harassment and bother.

“I suspect, however, that you are not God, and that like the rest of us, you are at the mercy of the education (read the “indoctrination”) that you have received and the content of media that you peruse, or the things reported directly to you by friends and acquaintances and even complete strangers.”

gandhigreatquoteWell, I’ve been accused of many things in my longish life – but never before of sycophantic adulation of authority figures. But there’s a first time for everything, I guess.

Back in NZ, in years gone by, standing as a candidate for a very anti-establishment political third party, my family was threatened and our house broken into, I assume to intimidate me.

I like to think I have retained a healthy disrespect for empty authority and political parties. At the same time, I give credit where credit is due – or how will the world ever get better?

The funny thing about this latest accusation, is most of the people I know in Istanbul are ardent haters of the AK Party Government, and outspoken critics of the president Mr Erdoğan. Interestingly, I don’t know anyone who has been imprisoned for their views, expressed verbally or via social media. I am not a paid lackey of the Turkish government, nor do I have anything much to gain by acknowledging their positive achievements. There are aspects of life in Turkey where I myself am outspoken in my criticism.

truth hurtsI am, however, here; have been for the best part of the past 22 years. I read widely, speak the language, and keep an eye on events here, and in the big world outside. If you’re interested in an alternative point-of-view on a fascinating, important and much-maligned country – WATCH THIS SPACE! 🙂

American professor says United States behind failed military coup in Turkey

petras-off

Good work, prof!

Yes he did! Professor James Petras, according to his bio on Amazon, “is a Bartle Professor (Emeritus) of Sociology at Binghamton University, New York. He is the author of 64 books published in 29 languages, and over 560 articles in professional journals, including the American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, Social Research, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Journal of Peasant Studies. He has published over 2000 articles in media such as The New York Times, the Guardian, the Nation, Christian Science Monitor, Foreign Policy, New Left Review, and a winner of the American Sociological Association Lifetime Achievement Award.”

Wow! That’s impressive! You’d have to take a guy like that seriously. I was directed the other day to an article he’s had published here, there and everywhere, entitled “Erdoğan’s Turkey Seven Deadly Sins”.

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So who’s lurking behind Fethullah Gülen?

Well, as I’m sure you know, the learned professor is referring to Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. In fact, Prof. Petras doesn’t have a good word to say about Mr Erdoğan, and his incriminating statements about the United States are buried deep in the 1,389-word paper – but there they are:

“Fethullah Gülen, who was conveniently self-exiled in the US and under the protection of the US intelligence apparatus.

“A Gülenists-led military coup was launched in July 2016, with the tacit support of the US military stationed in Turkey.

“The Gülenists coup was authored and led by its supremo Fethullah Gülen, ensconced in his ‘secret’ private estate in the United States. Clearly the US was implicated in the coup and they rejected Erdoğan’s demands to extradite him.

“Erdoğan backed the brief government of Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood after its electoral victory in 2012 following the ‘Arab Spring’ uprising in Egypt of 2011. This led to a bloody US-backed military coup led by General Abdel Sisi in July 2013 — a lesson not lost on Erdoğan.”

overthrow

A book I heartily recommend. Check out the subtitle

Well, Professor Petras doesn’t include any references or sources – unusual for an academic – so we have to take his word for those assertions, as for all the others in his “paper”.  And by the way, the US denied any involvement in the Egypt coup – or even that it was a coup at all! Nevertheless, I’m led to believe Petras is, himself, a reputable source, so we must assume he has evidence to back up his accusations.

I’m hoping, in the interests of fair play, natural justice and journalistic integrity, that Professor Petras will publish a paper providing a little more detail on the United States government’s involvement in these attacks on the elected governments of allies and sovereign states. Many people in Turkey would like to read it.

Western media’s love affair with Orhan Pamuk

“They have killed the Istanbul I loved” – a plaintive cry from Turkish Nobel Prize-winning novelist Orhan Pamuk in an interview he gave recently to the Italian newspaper La Stampa. Apparently the poor guy can’t live there any more because his memories have been destroyed.

orhan-pamuk-5-

Longing for the good old days

Well, I can empathise with Mr Pamuk’s problem. It’s a function of getting old, I guess, and of spending a lot of time away from the place of your birth. I haven’t lived in my hometown Auckland for 16 years. When I go back for a visit now, I hardly recognise the place I once knew so well. But there’s no use crying about it. It’s the way of the world. Some Native Americans possibly wish they could turn back the clock to a time before those Palefaces arrived – but sad to say, they can’t. There is a Turkish saying, “İt havlar kervan yürür”“The dogs bark but the caravan moves on.”

But Orhan Pamuk likes to bark, especially in the cause of selling more books – a shameless self-publicist who has no scruples about running down his own country and people to further his own “literary” career.

It’s an interesting exercise to follow interviews Pamuk has given to western journalists over the years, and to observe how his projected self-image has morphed according to his own self-seeking agenda. In the La Stampa interview he says he is “jealous of Western writers” as they are not constantly questioned about politics by interviewers. He claims he has been forced to answer politically charged questions and this has “turned him into a political writer.” This is the guy who, back in 2005, speaking to a Swiss journalist, said that “a million Armenians and 30,000 Kurds were killed in this country and I’m the only one who dares to talk about it”.

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Rubbing shoulders with ordinary Turks in his school days – NOT!

Well, those are politically charged issues in Turkey, as Pamuk knew full well – and many Turks were of the opinion that he was making such statements with a view to attracting the attention of the Nobel Awards committee. It’s a well-known fact that novelists from developing countries unpopular in the West who criticise their own governments give themselves a head start in the race for Nobel honours. When Pamuk achieved his goal of Nobel literary honours in 2006, Turkey’s President at the time, Ahmet Necdet Sezer, broke with his normal practice of congratulating high achieving Turks, and refused to acknowledge his countryman’s Nobel Prize. It should also be noted that Sezer was not aligned with the current AK Party government, but held the presidency by appointment of an earlier secular republican Kemalist administration.

But to return to the Italian report, Pamuk acknowledges that he spends much of his time in New York City, so we can understand that he will be somewhat out of touch with developments back home. “The old houses I love have been destroyed,” he laments. Well, the guy grew up in the old money quarter of Nişantaşı, with parents wealthy enough to send him to the elite American Robert College, to buy carloads of books to feed his passion for reading, and to support him while he dropped in and out of university without ever troubling himself to work for a living. If he had ventured, as a young man, to other parts of his beloved Istanbul during the 1970s and 80s, he would have seen vast swathes of old wooden Ottoman houses bulldozed and replaced by slum shanties for migrant workers from the east of Turkey. But he didn’t. And one thing is definitely true about Mr Pamuk – he was no youthful revolutionary idealist activist during Turkey’s most turbulent period of political upheaval in those decades. In a New York Times interview in 2014, he further admitted that, while his friends were risking their lives facing down soldiers, he spent most days reading at home in Nişantaşı.”

louis-vuitton-stores-tr-louis-vuitton-istanbul-nisantasi--StFi_Louis_Vuitton_ISTANBUL_1_NISANTASI_390_v2_DI3.jpg

Let’s go shopping – in Nişantaşı 😉

In contrast, then, one of the images Pamuk likes to create for himself is that of a lone courageous voice calling his government to task for historical human rights abuses. He was charged, he loves to repeat, with treason for his outspoken support of Armenians and Kurds, and lived abroad in virtual exile for fear of incarceration or worse. What he omits to say is that the charges were brought by an ultra-nationalist private citizen, not the Turkish government, and were subsequently dropped.

But the Western media love him – and that’s probably another reason to be suspicious.