Life is Strange!

DSCF0206We went to a concert on Friday evening. It was part of a programme presented by the organisers of the 2017 Gümüşlük Classical Music Festival. The venue is an ancient quarry said to be the source of the stone used in the construction of the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. It’s a spectacular and evocative setting, as you can imagine.

Top musicians from Turkey and Europe come to Gümüşlük every summer to run master classes for promising young musicians, and give a series of concerts for holidaymakers lucky enough to be around at the time.

IMG_2057We enjoyed a programme of music by Saint-Saens, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Fauré and Brahms played by cellist Dilbağ Tokay and pianist Eren Levendoğlu. It was marvellous – but that’s not actually what I want to tell you about.

We arrived at the venue some 40 minutes early, so we popped over to a restaurant across the road for a coffee to pass the time. As I was waiting to pay the bill, the gentleman ahead of me said “Hello”. Well, I’m accustomed to being identified as a foreigner by Turks wanting to practise their English. “Hello,” I replied. “What’s your name?” The gentleman looked a little taken aback. “My name is Gilles,” he replied. “Ah, are you French?” I asked. Yes he was. We exchanged a few pleasantries during which I told him I’m from New Zealand but I live in Istanbul, and he told me he lives in California. “Nice to meet you, etc etc.”

So we showed our tickets, found our seats in the quarry, and I began leafing through the programme. It soon emerged that my new French acquaintance was actually one of the stars of the festival, a world famous violinist, Gilles Apap! His brief bio informed me that Yehudi Menuhin himself had identified M. Apap as a virtuoso for the 21st century. Sad to say we had missed his one-and-only concert a few days earlier – and I hadn’t even got his autograph.

Well, I checked him out online when we got home. You can visit Gilles Apap’s website here. Not only is he an accomplished classical violinist, his repertoire extends to gypsy music and American folk. As small compensation for my ignorance, I purchased an album from iTunes, Gypsy Tunes. You can listen to a sample here:

Life is strange!

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